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The latest news from Business Insider

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    The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you'll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

    meundies $25 $100+

    Over the weeks leading up to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, the Insider Picks team spends countless hours combing through hundreds of thousands of deals to bring you the very best of the bunch.

    So far, we've written about everything from the best deals you can find on Amazon to the best tech deals on the internet— we've even covered men's and women's fashion sales, and what to buy from Wayfair if you need some new furniture. 

    But we thought it might be fun for you to see what we, the human beings behind all these articles, are buying for ourselves — especially after spending so much time getting to know what has felt like every deal on the internet.

    If you're interested in knowing how we're spending our money right now, look no further — here's what we've bought so far. 

    Want more deals? We've rounded up the best Cyber Monday deals on the internet.

    To potentially save more on Cyber Monday, you can visit Business Insider Coupons to find up-to-date promo codes for a range of online stores.

    A year-long subscription to Hulu

    Annual Hulu Subscription

    I’ve been using a friend’s Hulu account for about a year. Especially in the last few months since I got rid of cable, I've noticed myself using Hulu more and more in conjunction with my Netflix subscription. I finally decided to get my own Hulu account because $1 a month for a year is an amazing deal. -Breton Fischetti, Director of Commerce Insider Picks

    This deal was simply too good to pass up. Altogether, it'll save me $60+ over the course of the year. — Mara Leighton, Insider Picks reporter



    Hotels for a vacation to Italy

    Mulino di Firenze, from $118 per night, available on Hotels.com

    My partner and I booked a week's worth of hotels on Hotels.com, which is currently offering 11% off anything you book with the code BIGDEAL11.

    This hotel in Florence is the one we're most excited about. It has a beautiful pool, and it's right on the river. We'll have to pay for cabs to get around since it's a bit further out from the center of town, but the fact that we saved a bit while booking evens things out. I mean, look at that view! -Sally Kaplan, Insider Picks editor



    A set of illustrated Harry Potter novels

    Harry Potter: The Illustrated Collection (Books 1-3 Boxed Set), $56.50 at Amazon (originally $120) 

    As odd as it sounds, I actually don’t ever shop on Black Friday or Cyber Monday — I'm more of a Small Business Saturday and Giving Tuesday kind of person. I didn’t buy anything this year, either, though I did find something I wanted for Christmas and asked my mom to get it for me: the 3-book boxed set of Harry Potter illustrated novels.

    I’m a huge HP fan, and I’ve wanted the illustrated versions ever since they came out. At more than half off, they’re a crazy good deal, so I couldn't resist asking for them. I'm pretty sure these books will be under my Christmas tree this year in a lovely package from mom to me. -Malarie Gokey, Insider Picks guides editor



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Google campus

    • Google paid $1 billion to buy a large business park near its Mountain View, California, headquarters, according to a Mercury News report on Monday. 
    • The business park Google will acquire in the deal is larger than its Googleplex headquarters located just a few blocks away. 
    • The $1 billion purchase is the largest Bay Area real-estate deal in 2018 and is second largest in the US to only Google's $2.4 billion acquisition of Chelsea Market in Manhattan, New York. 
    • Google's newest land acquisition, known as Mountain View’s Shoreline Technology Park, is a 51.8-acre site with 12 buildings.

    Google has paid $1 billion to buy a large business park near its Mountain View, California, headquarters, according to a Mercury News report on Monday. 

    The business park Google will acquire in the deal is larger than the Googleplex headquarters located a few blocks away, according to the report. The land parcel is also larger than the Google's planned "Charleston East" campus that will feature futuristic domes and canopies. 

    The deal is the latest big-ticket real-estate purchase by Google and parent company Alphabet, as the internet giant's aggressive expansion plans swell its headcount. As of September 30, Alphabet had 94,372 employees, an increase of roughly 16,000 employees from one year ago.

    And with more than $100 billion worth of cash and short-term securities on its balance sheet, Alphabet can afford to go on a real-estate shopping spree.

    Read more:Here are the latest plans for Google's crazy new campus

    The $1 billion purchase is the largest Bay Area real-estate deal in 2018 and second largest in the US to only Google's $2.4 billion acquisition of Chelsea Market in Manhattan, New York, according to the report. 

    Google's newest land acquisition, known as Mountain View’s Shoreline Technology Park, is a 51.8-acre site with 12 buildings. Currently, the only other tenant besides Google is Alexza Pharmaceuticals. 

    Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    SEE ALSO: The last time Microsoft was more valuable than Apple, the Zune was still taking on the iPod

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: A running coach explains how to get through the NYC marathon this weekend


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    The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you'll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

    Screen Shot 2018 11 23 at 2.09.45 PM

    • Cyber Monday deals week is here, and one of the best deals we've seen so far is a year-long Hulu Limited Commercials subscription for $0.99 a month, or just $12 for a year.
    • A subscription typically costs $7.99 a month, so you'll end up saving $84. 
    • The deal is running throughout Cyber Monday (November 26). It's available to new subscribers and past subscribers whose subscription ended over 12 months ago. 
    • To potentially save more on Cyber Monday, you can visit Business Insider Coupons to find up-to-date promo codes for a range of online stores.

    It's Cyber Monday deals week, and one of the best deals we've seen so far today is from Hulu. 

    Until November 26, new and lapsed subscribers (people who haven't had an active Hulu account in over 12 months) can get a one year of Hulu for $0.99 per month. 

    This deal applies to Hulu's Limited Commercials subscription, which means you'll still need to watch some ads, but it's a great deal considering the subscription usually costs $7.99 per month. You end up saving $84 over the course of a year.

    Hulu is one of the highest profile video-streaming services, and sets itself apart from Netflix in one big way. In addition to carrying a wide catalog of classic shows (Seinfeld, The X-Files), exclusive shows (Handmaids Tale, I Love You, America), and movies (Akira, Transformers: The Last Night), Hulu also lets you watch new episodes of hit cable TV shows shortly after they air. Episodes of new shows are typically made available on Hulu the day after they air. 

    Hulu has over 150 currently airing shows in its catalog, and it includes everything from Blackish, to The Good Place, to Rick and Morty. If your favorite shows are currently airing on a major network or cable channel, chances are they'll be available. 

    You can watch these shows on your computer, or through Hulu's app, which is available on iOS and Android or the Apple TV, Fire TV, and Roku.

    If you've been wanting to give Hulu a try, or you canceled your subscription over a year ago, don't pass up this Cyber Monday deal. It'll cost you less than a cup of coffee a month, and you'll get cheap access to all of your favorite shows for an entire year.

    Sign up for one year of Hulu for $0.99 per month here >>

    Looking for more deals? We've rounded up the best Cyber Monday deals on the internet.

    cyber monday 4x3

    The best deal roundups

    The best individual deals

    SEE ALSO: Allbirds has dropped a limited-edition sneaker for Cyber Monday

    Join the conversation about this story »


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    neeraj arora whatsapp

    • WhatsApp's chief business officer Neeraj Arora is quitting.
    • He's the latest in a long line of senior execs to quit Facebook, from the cofounders of Instagram to Oculus.
    • Arora's departure follows ugly clashes between WhatsApp's cofounders and Facebook leadership.
    • He says he plans to spent time with his family.

    The chief business officer of WhatsApp is leaving, the latest in a line of high-level departures at Facebook and its associated apps.

    Neeraj Arora, a seven-year veteran of the encrypted messaging app, announced on Facebook on Monday that he was stepping down, saying he planned to spend more time with his family.

    "It is time to move on, but I cannot be more proud of how WhatsApp continues to touch people in so many different ways every day. I am confident that WhatsApp will continue to be the simple, secure & trusted communication product for years to come," he wrote. "I'm going to be taking some time off to recharge and spend time with family."

    Arora's exit comes as Facebook lurches from scandal to scandal, and in the wake of a number of high-profile executive exits. Earlier this year the two cofounders of Instagram, Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, left the Facebook-owned photo-sharing app, and Oculus cofounder Brendan Iribe made his exit in October

    WhatsApp has proved particularly contentious for Facebook. WhatsApp's cofounder and CEO Jan Koum bailed out in April 2018, reportedly as a result of privacy concerns. And in September, WhatsApp's other cofounder, Brian Acton, went public with allegations of fiery clashes with Facebook's leadership over monetization. (He has also previously called on people to #DeleteFacebook.)


    Do you work at Facebook or WhatsApp? Got a tip? Contact this reporter via Signal or WhatsApp at +1 (650) 636-6268 using a non-work phone, email at rprice@businessinsider.com, Telegram or WeChat at robaeprice, or Twitter DM at @robaeprice. (PR pitches by email only, please.) You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop.



    WhatsApp is among Facebook's most widely-used products, though the company has moved slowly in efforts to monetize the free-to-use app.

    Arora, a former Google employee, joined WhatsApp in November 2011 and served as its chief business officer. After Koum's resignation, there was some speculation that Arora would be made the app's next chief exec — but that role ultimately went to Chris Daniels, formerly VP of internet.org, Facebook's internet connectivity efforts.

    Here's Neeraj Arora's full public goodbye post:

    "Time flies for sure but not memories. It is hard to believe that it has been seven years since Jan and Brian got me onboard at WhatsApp, and it has been one hell of a ride!

    "I've been blessed to work with a small set of talented people and see how maniacal focus can create something magical which is loved by billions of people. It is time to move on, but I cannot be more proud of how WhatsApp continues to touch people in so many different ways every day. I am confident that WhatsApp will continue to be the simple, secure & trusted communication product for years to come.

    "I'm going to be taking some time off to recharge and spend time with family. I am deeply indebted to Jan and Brian, who entrusted me to be their business companion for so many years and I am thankful to each one of you who has supported me along the way and made this exciting journey possible."

    SEE ALSO: How Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg could be humbled by a creepy bikini ap

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: The NFL is using this football helmet that morphs on impact to reduce head injuries


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    The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you'll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

    casper mattress cyber monday 15% off

    In the last few years, a lot of online mattress startups have popped up. They've taken out the middlemen and the accompanying costs of showrooms. As a result, the same or superior mattresses are offered for less money and hassle than the brick-and-mortar store.

    Of the many startups out there, Casper may be king.

    The company has become synonymous with successful online startups, and has expanded from its first mattress sale in 2014 to begin selling sheets (which we reviewed here), pillows (find our review here), and even dog beds. (you bet we had one of our dogs try the bed). It also doesn't hurt that every mattress comes with a 100-night money-back guarantee and a 10-year warranty, which is pretty much par for the course in the industry.

    In other words, Casper is a grown-up cult-favorite, and the company owes a lot of that success to a really great mattress, the convenience of no-hassle home delivery, and pretty awesome prices.

    On a regular day, you can get the company's best-seller, The Casper, from $595 for a twin size, and the streamlined Essential mattress from as low as $350. The upgraded high-end mattress, The Wave, comes in at $1,250 to start.

    For Cyber Monday, Business Insider readers can get an exclusive 15% mattresses when they apply the code "BICM15" at checkout. So, for example, if you add a queen-size Casper Wave Mattress ($2,250) to your cart, you'll save $337.50 on your purchase.

    If you've been meaning to get a new mattress — or bedding of any kind — now is a great time to act. Casper's prices are already low to remain competitive, and sales don't happen often.

    Get 15% off Casper mattresses with the code "BICM15"

    If you're interested in learning more before committing to a Casper mattress, these guides will help you out:

    Looking for more deals? We've rounded up the best Cyber Monday deals on the internet.

    cyber monday 4x3

    The best deal roundups

    The best individual deals

    DON'T MISS: 50 Cyber Monday deals from cool startups you should have on your radar this week

    SEE ALSO: Brooklinen's only sale of the year is going on through Cyber Monday — here's how to save up to 20% on sheets and bedding

    Join the conversation about this story »


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    Tomi Lahren

    • Fox Nation, Fox News' new opinion streaming service, will be available Tuesday. 
    • The service features Fox News' most well-known and controversial figures, like Tucker Carlson and Tomi Lahren.
    • Fox News says that early purchases suggest a younger demographic could be served by the platform.
    • Professor Reece Peck says that the plan could end up encouraging cord cutting. 

    Fox News has built a reputation for serving its news, analysis, and opinion with a conservative edge. With Tuesday's launch of its opinion-only streaming service, Fox Nation, it's leaning further into that sometimes controversial brand.

    "I think our brand identity is pretty clear at this point," said Fox News senior vice president of development and production John Finley. "We want as many of the superfans as we can get."

    To cater to Fox News' already massive audience, which according to Nielsen averages 1.7 million daily daytime viewers and 2.8 million nightly primetime viewers, Fox Nation has recruited some of its most popular and most controversial figures to produce new content for the platform, which will apparently feature no traditional broadcast news coverage.

    Tomi Lahren, who recently caused a stir after calling the conflict between migrants and border agents "the highlight" of her Thanksgiving weekend, has so far been the figurehead of Fox Nation's promotional material and will have a twice-daily show on the platform. "Tomi is a massively important part of this," said Finley. "She’s very popular with our audience and has a tremendous following."

    But Finley says Lahren's prominence in Fox Nation's promotional material was simply because she was one of the earliest personalities to sign on. 

    Other notable Fox News names appearing are on the new platform's roster include Sean Hannity, Laura Ingraham, Tucker Carlson, and Jesse Watters, who have all made headlines for their distinctly conservative commentary. "Basically all of our big talent here at the Fox News channel have some sort of participation in Fox Nation," explained Finley, characterizing the platform's stars as "people that our fans have come to know and love and want to see more of."

    Read more: A Fox News guest suggested that the tear gas being used on migrants at the border was so 'natural' you could 'put it on your nachos'

    Finley stressed that Fox Nation will also host some personalities that are new to the network.

    The day before the platform's launch, Fox News announced conservative YouTube duo Diamond & Silk will be releasing weekly 5-minute videos for Fox Nation. The duo rose to fame on the conservative web during Trump's 2016 campaign and have been the center of their own share of controversy over payments from the Trump campaign and accusations of censorship against Facebook. Their selection seemingly represents an appeal to a more-connected, web-based audience that Fox News may be trying to tap into with its service — Nielsen estimates that over half of Fox News' audience is over the age of 65, despite the network coming out on top in ratings for the younger demographic.

    Finley denied the idea that Fox Nation and its roster are a direct play to bring younger conservatives into the Fox News fold, but suggested that that could be a fundamental effect of the platform: "If younger viewers find us through mobile, then terrific... based on the numbers we’ve seen with the pre-sale program in the last two or three weeks or so there are a lot of people who are signing up who are on mobile devices, which leads us to believe that there is a younger audience that’s interested in this."

    Fox Nation

    Besides an effort to cast a wider demographic net, Fox Nation may serve other goals for Fox News. 

    Fox Nation is a unique service among its competitors. No other major news channel in the US has an opinion-only streaming service.

    Fox has received multiple signals that their viewers want more opinion content. Between October 2017 and October 2018, Fox News' primetime viewership, which is stacked with its opinion all-stars, increased by 25% compared to their 16% daytime viewership increase, according to Nielsen. CNN saw just a 1% increase in primetime viewership over the same period. 

    Yochai Benkler, co-director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and co-author of the recent examination of partisan media Network Propaganda, suggested that Fox News is uniquely suited to benefit from such an opinion service, saying that it appears to be designed to  "jettison any connection to news."

    According to Benkler's network research, Fox News and other conservative outlets have created their own media ecosystem separate from centrist and liberal sources. Benkler theorizes that the conservative ecosystem has created a feedback loop where a "steady flow of stories and opinions provide viewers a way of understanding who they are in opposition and in outrage to someone else." Benkler says this strategy has created a loyal base, but only to a certain ideology.

    Benkler's research showed that "Fox News lost some audience during the primaries, because it was slower than some to jump on the Trump train, and it eventually reasserted its dominance and became more secure by becoming more right wing."

    Benkler speculated that Fox Nation will create a more steady stream of viewers, generate revenue, and provide insulation for some of Fox's major personalities from ad boycotts that have recently hit the network.

    Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham both faced serious ad boycotts in the last few years where consumers targeted companies and demanding they pull their ads from those programs.

    Reece Peck, assistant professor at the College of Staten Island and author of the upcoming book Fox Populism, said that while Fox Nation is essentially doubling-down on the conservative media formula that he believes made Fox News so successful, it could threaten to hurt the network's bottom line.

    "Fox News made its mark by innovating an opinion-heavy broadcasting formula," Peck said. "It was more responsive to audience trends on the ground" and, he added, "political talk shows are exceptionally cheap to produce."

    By those economic considerations, it's understandable why Fox News wants to double down on its conservative opinion content. "By primarily featuring low-cost opinion shows, Fox can test the performance of its conservative media brand in the younger, OTT market and do so with relatively low financial risk," said Peck.

    However, adding an online service to Fox News' roster could disrupt its business in a way that may not benefit them. "Giving Fox News fans an online alternative could incentivize cord-cutting, even among the older segments of their audience," said Peck." If they embrace the OTT model too much, they may very well kill the golden goose that is currently laying all the eggs."

    But according to Finley, Fox News isn't concerned about that: "I don’t think that Fox Nation is going to change the DNA of Fox News. I think that Fox Nation is an extension of the Fox News Channel's brand."

    "Fox News is obviously massively successful — we do what we do," added Finley.

    Fox Nation is available Tuesday for $5.99 monthly or $64.99 yearly.

    SEE ALSO: Fox News host Chris Wallace says Trump is seen as a 'beacon for repression' as they get into a heated back-and-forth over fake news

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Trump once won a lawsuit against the NFL — but the result was an embarrassment


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    The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you'll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.

    Amazon Echo

    • It's Cyber Monday, and you can save $60 on a bundle that includes a second-generation Amazon Echo and Sengled two-bulb starter kit thanks to a deal of the day.
    • The second-generation Echo is one of our favorite smart-home hubs, and you can use it to control Sengled's bulbs with your voice. The bulbs can also be controlled by an app on your phone.
    • This bundle costs $79 and the Echo on its own usually costs $99.99, which should give you a sense of how good a deal it is. But because it's a deal of the day, it'll be gone in a few hours, so act fast.
    • To potentially save more, you can visit Business Insider Coupons to find up-to-date promo codes for a range of online stores.

    Cyber Monday is here, and we've combed through thousands of deals from several stores to make sure you see the very best ones before they sell out.

    But some deals deserve special attention, and right now you can save $60 on a bundle that includes an Amazon Echo and a Sengled Smart Bulb Starter Kit. Unlike some Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals, this one is only available today.

    The Echo is our pick for the best voice-controller smart-home hub. Its built in Alexa assistant lets you control smart-home accessories, get answers to your questions, and increase the Echo's functionality through free third-party skills.

    The second-generation Echo included in this bundle has an improved speaker, which is more than good enough for listening to music casually in a living room or kitchen.

    Sengled's Smart Bulb Kit includes two smart light bulbs that can be screwed into any full-sized light fixture, and a hub that you connect to your Wi-Fi router over Ethernet. Once Sengled's hub is plugged in, you can control the bulbs through an app on your phone, or a smart-home hub like the Echo.

    You can turn the bulbs on and off, dim or brighten them, or set them on a particular schedule, so they're always on when you get home. Being able to control your lights via an app is convenient, but doing it with your voice is even more simple.

    If you're shopping for someone who's been dying to start their smart home, and has been particularly interested in smart lighting, this is a deal you shouldn't pass up. The entire bundle costs $79, while the Echo normally costs $99.99 on its own, which should give you a sense of how good it is. 

    But remember, because it's a deal of the day, you'll only have about 12 more hours before it disappears. It could also sell out beforehand, so your best bet is to act sooner than later. 

    Amazon Echo With 2 Smart Bulb Starter Kit by Sengled, $79 (originally $139.98) [You save $60.98]

    SEE ALSO: All of Insider Picks' holiday gift guides, in one place

    Join the conversation about this story »


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    jack ma alibaba laughing at the world as he rakes in the billions

    • Jack Ma, creator of e-commerce giant Alibaba Group, and China's wealthiest person alive, has been outed by Chinese media as a member of China's Communist Party.
    • Speculation about Ma's ties to the Chinese government have long been discussed, though he has often kept his distance from Beijing in his public comments.
    • On Monday, state-run People's Daily wrote that the Communist Party would be honoring 100 people, including Ma and two other internet-tech moguls, for their contributions to China's economy.
    • Experts say the revelation is a reminder of how President Xi Jinping is pushing Communist Party loyalty into every aspect of Chinese society and its economy.

    Jack Ma, creator of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group, and the country's wealthiest person alive, has been outed by state media as a member of the Communist Party of China (CPC).

    Speculation about Ma's ties to the Chinese government has long been discussed, though he has often kept his distance from Beijing in his public comments.

    And while his e-commerce company has previously raised money by selling shares to firms linked to the CPC, Ma has described his relationship with the government as: "Love them, but don't marry them."

    But on Monday, state-run People's Daily wrote that the CPC would be honoring 100 people, including Ma and two other internet-tech moguls, for their contributions to China's economy.

    The publication specifically referred to Ma as a "CPC member" and said that Ma had been listed as a "huge driving force for domestic demand" as head of Alibaba Group.

    "Under his leadership, Alibaba ranks among the top 10 global companies in terms of market value, making China a leading player in the international e-commerce industry, internet finance and cloud computing, spawning a large number of entrepreneurs and start-ups," People's Daily wrote, citing a government statement discussing the award. 

    The article also lists Robin Li, CEO of Baidu, China's top search engine, and Pony Ma, chairman of internet giant Tencent Holdings, as recipients of the honor. The article specifically refers to Li and Ma as "non-partisan."

    Bill Bishop, publisher of China newsletter Sinocism, says the revelation about Ma isn't surprising to many who have followed Alibaba's successful catapult into the global market.

    "No one doubted that Alibaba had to be close to the CPC to survive," Bishop told Business Insider, though he noted that other Chinese tech moguls have been able to build successful companies without pledging their support.

    Bishop added that while Ma decided to step down as chairman of the e-commerce giant in September 2019, the revelation of Ma's close ties to the Chinese government will likely continue through Alibaba. 

    "It's just another reminder that Alibaba has to be close to the CPC, and given how President Xi Jinping is pushing the party back into every aspect of business and life," Bishop continued, "it will only give ammunition to regulators who are already worried about Chinese firms."

    SEE ALSO: Jack Ma will step down as chairman of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba in September 2019

    DON'T MISS: Cracks may be starting to show in Xi Jinping's absolute rule over China because of Trump's trade war

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: The NFL is using this football helmet that morphs on impact to reduce head injuries


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    He Jiankui

    • The Chinese researcher who claims to have led the creation of the world's first genetically edited human babies, has been suspended without pay since February.
    • His unverified claims of leading the team behind genetically edited human babies has attracted fierce condemnation for breaching medical ethics — and possibly the law.
    • The researcher, He Jiankui, is now also being investigated by his university.

    He Jiankui, largely unknown until yesterday, is an associate professor at Shenzhen’s Southern University of Science and Technology of China (南方科技大学 or SUSTC).

    The Guangdong province-based researcher said he used gene-editing tool CRISPR on embryos of seven different couples during IVF treatment, resulting in the birth of twin girls this month.

    CRISPR is a molecular tool that allows scientists to edit sections of DNA. Many researchers are interested in using the technology to eliminate or treat genetic diseases, as Business Insider has previously reported.

    The result He claims, was newborn twin girls, who have been bestowed with immunity to HIV through CRISPR edited DNA.

    According to an Associated Press report, He Jiankui said the father had the disease and the mother did not. He said his ultimate goal was to alter the babies' genes in a way that would protect them from future HIV infection.

    The Shenzhen university distanced itself from He in a statement Monday that said the researcher had been on unpaid leave from February 1, 2018 and was not expected to return until January 2021.

    He's academic board said He had “seriously violated academic ethics and norms."

    "Our school will immediately hire authoritative experts to set up an independent committee to conduct in-depth investigations and publish relevant information after investigation," SUSTC said in the statement.

    Read more:A Chinese researcher claims that the first gene-edited babies have been born, and scientists are disturbed

    Caixin reports that He also heads six companies in China, mostly in the genetics sector.

    When contacted by the Chinese magazine, a representative of Shenzhen Hanhai Genetic Biology Technology Co. Ltd. — one of the companies He runs — refused to say if they were aware of the project, but told Caixin the experiment was not conducted on their premises.

    The experiment has in no way been verified or published in any academic journal.

    China’s state-run People’s Daily published an online article about it on Monday but later removed the story.

    There has been a follow up article in the English language version of the Communist Party mouthpiece, distancing itself from the controversy.

    If it is true, the experiment is deeply controversial.

    Gene-editing of this nature is illegal in many countries including the United States and according to Caixin, such experimentation is also banned by a Chinese regulators.

    More than 120 Chinese scientists signed a letter condemning the claim by He.

    “The project completely ignored the principles of biomedical ethics, conducting experiments on humans without proving it’s safe,” said Qiu Zilong, a neuroscience researcher with the Chinese Academy of Sciences (中国科学) in Shanghai who wrote the letter.

    “We can only describe such behaviour as crazy.”

    According to the South China Morning Post, the letter was published on social media on late Monday and was signed by scientists at some of China’s leading research universities, such as Peking University and Tsinghua, as well as overseas institutions, including Stanford in the US and Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research.

    SEE ALSO: Bill Gates says it would be a tragedy to pass up gene editing technology

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: The first woman in space almost didn't make it back to Earth and she had to keep it a secret for 30 years


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    Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker

    • Fifteen attorneys general filed an amicus brief on Monday supporting Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh's motion to block Matthew Whitaker from serving as US attorney general.
    • Whitaker was named acting attorney general following former Attorney General Jeff Session's resignation in early November. Whitaker previously served as Session's chief of staff not as deputy attorney general.
    • The 15 attorneys general argue that Whitaker's appointment is illegal because it breaks the stated chain of succession.
    • On November 13, Frosh's office filed a motion for a preliminary injunction to stop Whitaker from acting as attorney general, or to substitute Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein as a defendant in an ongoing suit between Maryland and the federal government over the Affordable Care Act.

    Fifteen attorneys general filed an amicus brief on Monday supporting Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh's motion to block Matthew Whitaker from serving as US attorney general.

    Whitaker was named acting attorney general following former Attorney General Jeff Session's resignation in early November. Whitaker previously served as Session's chief of staff not as deputy attorney general.

    In the amicus brief, attorneys general from the Pennsylvania, the District of Columbia, New York, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Washington argue that the appointment of Whitaker is illegal because it "ignores long-established vacancy succession laws, and is in violation of Congress’ clear designation of the Deputy Attorney General as the Acting Attorney General," according to a statement from New York State Attorney General Barbara Underwood.

    On November 13, Frosh's office filed a motion for a preliminary injunction to stop Whitaker from acting as attorney general, or to substitute Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein as a defendant in an ongoing suit between Maryland and the federal government over the Affordable Care Act.

    Read more:Here's a full timeline of acting AG Matthew Whitaker's controversial past

    Frosh argues that Whitaker's appointment violates violates 28 U.S.C. Section 508, which stipulates that the deputy AG should take over if the attorney general resigns, and that Whitaker's appointment violates law that stipulates that the Senate must confirm "principal officers"— of which attorney general was one of the original four stipulated in the Constitution.

    "In this case, the health care of millions of Marylanders and Americans is at stake," Frosh said in a statement. "The suit cannot go forward without a legitimate Attorney General, and an Acting Attorney General making decisions that could affect matters of life and death without lawful authority puts all of us at risk."

    The amicus brief from the 15 attorneys general supports Maryland, and argues that the legal uncertainty around Whitaker makes it difficult for the states to coordinate law enforcement agencies with the Department of Justice, and thus impacts the residents of the 14 states plus the District of Columbia.

    The Department of Justice did not immediately respond to INSIDER's request for comment on Monday night.

    SEE ALSO: From arguing federal judges should be Christian to being involved in a scam shut down by the FTC Here's a full timeline of acting AG Matthew Whitaker's controversial past

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    Screen Shot 2018 11 26 at 7.20.45 PM

    • In a lighthearted segment on Monday night, CNN host Anderson Cooper targeted a series of tweets in which President Donald Trump appeared to conflate the weather with climate.
    • Trump and his advisers have refrained from unequivocally associating climate change with human activity, and have thrown cold water on the latest findings from a new federal assessment.
    • Cooper advised Trump to visit a child-friendly NASA website for an explanation in the differences between weather and climate.
    • Cooper handed off his program to CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, who also piled on with the shade.

    CNN host Anderson Cooper responded to President Donald Trump's comments on climate change, after the release of a new federal climate change assessment that gave a harrowing view of an unmitigated climate.

    In a light-hearted segment on Monday night, Cooper targeted a series of tweets in which Trump appeared to conflate the weather with climate.

    "Brutal and Extended Cold Blast could shatter ALL RECORDS - Whatever happened to Global Warming," Trump tweeted last week, adding later that it was "the coldest weather in the history of the Thanksgiving Day Parade in NYC, and one of the coldest Thanksgivings on record!"

    "Give me clean, beautiful and healthy air - not the same old climate change (global warming) bullshit," Trump also tweeted in 2014. "I am tired of hearing this nonsense."

    "The President of the United States seems to be honestly believing that Global Warming means it never gets cold anywhere," Cooper said, trying to hold back his laughter as he continued his segment.

    Screen Shot 2018 11 26 at 7.36.51 PM

    Throughout his presidency, Trump and his advisers have refrained from associating climate change with human activity, and have thrown cold water on the latest findings of the newest federal report: "I've seen it, I've read some of it, and it's fine," Trump told reporters on Monday, adding later, "I don't believe it."

    Cooper advised Trump to visit a child-friendly NASA website for an explanation in the differences between weather and climate. Climate is defined as "big picture" conditions over a period of time for a location, according to NASA's ClimateKids, while weather is considered to be specific conditions for a set time and place.

    Read more: 'A s---show in a dumpster fire': Attorney George Conway, husband of Kellyanne Conway, rails against the Trump administration

    "We're just suggesting, Mr. President, if you don't want to believe science or the 1,600-page report your team tried to slip past the American public on Friday, maybe just start with ClimateKids.nasa.gov," Cooper said.

    He also quipped, "it's a pretty easy read, it's fun, there are pictures."

    "But we're not going to hold our breath," Cooper added. "Because unlike the climate, some things never actually change."

    trump visits paradise camp fire

    The National Climate Assessment, authored by hundreds of leading climate scientists, is a 1,656 page report released by the Trump administration on Friday, the day after Thanksgiving. The report, which was mandated by Congress and produced by 13 federal agencies, assessed both the current climate and future impacts.

    Some of the effects, including flooding and warming oceans, "could affect the economic stability of local governments, businesses, and the broader economy," the report said.

    Cooper handed off his program to CNN anchor Chris Cuomo, who referenced Trump's deceased uncle, John Trump, in a quip. Trump repeatedly mentions John, a former electrical engineering professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in defense of his views on climate change.

    "Anderson, you forgot uncle John," Cuomo said. "You forgot Trump's uncle John...at MIT. Very smart, a scientist."

    "You're right. The very smart uncle," Anderson said, smiling. "Right. I totally forgot it."

    SEE ALSO: Sen. Chuck Grassley has some thoughts about Trump's attacks on federal judges

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    NOW WATCH: Lindsey Graham once warned there would be 'holy hell to pay' if Trump fired Jeff Sessions


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    liz lemon 30 rock desk

    • Sitting at a desk for eight hours straight can make losing weight difficult.
    • The keys to losing weight are good nutrition and movement.
    • There are little ways to shed weight at the office, like taking the stairs, preparing your meals ahead of time, and doing bodyweight circuits at your desk.

    When you're working from an office desk, movement is probably at a minimum. Meetings are held in conference rooms, so you're basically just carting your body from one sedentary location to the next, and depending on your workload, venturing out of your cubicle for lunch might not always be an option.

    And unfortunately, not all work environments are the healthiest, either. There's always a birthday to be celebrated, coffee breaks in a kitchen tempt you with snack-filled cabinet, and breakfast meetings are made a little more bearable with a spread of bagels and cream cheese. 

    Trying to lose weight while working a desk job can almost feel like an impossible task if you're only focusing on that eight-hour time-stamp. You can shed the weight, it just requires you to put in the time (both in and outside the office) and commitment. Here are a few expert tips on how to do just that.

    Keep moving.

    Easier said than done, but it is possible.

    "As a trainer working with clients of all types from professional athletes to lawyers for over 10 years, my motto is and has always been that you have to keep moving," CEO and founder of CrushFit, Ben Williamson said. "Whether it's walking the dog, going for a run, biking to work, or simply sliding the sneakers on at lunch and walking around the business park, 9-5 workers need to do something to keep moving."



    Invest in a mini fridge.

    Translation: Say buh-bye to takeout lunches and grab-and-go snacks from the kitchen.

    "For people who find it difficult to leave the desk to eat, getting a mini fridge and packing it with healthy easy to grab sliced fruits and vegetables is a must to beat the temptation for grazing on chips and cookies," American College of Sports Medicine Certified personal trainer, V Shred's lead trainer, and an expert in nutrition, Benjamin Suyematsu told INSIDER.



    Find every and any excuse to walk.

    "If you drive to work park far," Suyematsu said. "The key to losing weight with a desk job is to look for ways to move more and sit less. If you work at an office complex park far and walk to and from your actual office."

    Also, it's definitely time to start taking the dreaded stairs over the elevator. At least you know the stairwell won't be crowded at 9 a.m.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi talks to reporters before heading into a Democratic caucus meeting in the Capitol on Nov. 14.

    • Newly-elected House Democrats are jockeying for power as Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi scrambles to assemble the required votes to be elected Speaker in the new Congress. 
    • A letter drafted by Michigan Rep.-elect Elissa Slotkin is being passed around the large freshman class, asking Pelosi to place incoming Democrats on powerful committees, among other demands. 
    • "Make no mistake, we are united in the belief that the Class of 2019 has a responsibility and mandate for change in the U.S. Congress," the letter reads. 

    Playing on their powerful numbers following a "blue wave" election, newly-elected House Democrats are jockeying for power as Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi scrambles to assemble the required votes to be elected Speaker in the new Congress. 

    A letter drafted by Michigan Rep.-elect Elissa Slotkin is being passed around the large freshman class, demanding that Pelosi and other Democratic leaders place incoming Democrats on the powerful Appropriations, Rules, Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, and Financial Services committees. 

    It holds that the incoming class (which will make up more than 25% of the caucus) was elected on a mandate of change — and that Democratic voters want them to be a "driving force" in the legislative process.

    While it's not clear who will sign the letter besides Slotkin, the demand acknowledges that the new lawmakers aren't necessarily united on policy specifics. More than two-thirds of the class will represent red-leaning districts while others, like Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, were elected on leftist platforms in deep blue districts to replace longtime Democratic incumbents.

    "We are a diverse group. Politically and ideologically, we have different views," the letter reads. "But make no mistake, we are united in the belief that the Class of 2019 has a responsibility and mandate for change in the U.S. Congress."

    It calls for new members to fill two spots on the Steering and Policy Committee (which handles the party's communications messaging and committee assignments), for all bills to be available for review for 72 hours before a vote, and for monthly meetings to discuss legislation with leadership. 

    Ocasio-Cortez, for her part, is pushing for a seat on the powerful Energy and Commerce Committee, which would give her influence over health care, environmental issues, and energy policy — an opportunity to forward some of her key campaign promises, including single-payer healthcare and a Green New Deal. 

    Rep.-elect Elissa Slotkin on election night in Michigan.

    This comes as Pelosi is working fastidiously behind the scenes to convince her colleagues — new and old — to support her bid for speaker, as an insurgent group of Democrats pushes for new, younger leadership. 

    The minority leader and her allies argue that her fundraising prowess, significant legislative accomplishments, recent electoral victories, and a lack of any strong progressive alternative should be enough to vault her to the speakership. Pelosi has said she's "100 percent" confident she'll return to her former position as speaker in the new Congress, citing "overwhelming support" in her caucus.

    Read more: Nancy Pelosi is using gender to win over progressives in her fight to become House speaker

    And the effort to replace Pelosi — spearheaded by a group of largely centrist lawmakers — took a blow last week when Rep. Marcia Fudge, who'd been put forward as a potential challenger, announced she wouldn't run for speaker after Pelosi promised to revive a subcommittee on elections and name Fudge its chair. 

    Rep. Seth Moulton, a Massachusetts centrist and one of the leaders of the anti-Pelosi faction, released a statement on Monday suggesting he would be open to negotiating with Pelosi — suggesting that her two veteran deputies Reps. Steny Hoyer and Jim Clyburn be replaced. 

    But while Pelosi is expected to win the support of a majority of the Democratic caucus during a Wednesday closed-door vote, her opposition insists it has the votes to derail her bid on the House floor. 

    SEE ALSO: Nancy Pelosi is using gender to win over progressives in her fight to become House speaker

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    NOW WATCH: Megyn Kelly in 2017: 'I regret a lot' of the controversial stuff I've said on live television


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    jenna dewan

    Dancer/actress Jenna Dewan burst onto the scene in 2006's "Step Up," and has become a health guru on Instagram thanks in part to her active and dance-filled life.

    The performer needs a healthy diet to power her active lifestyle, which is why she doesn't believe in dieting and instead lives a "mostly vegan" lifestyle. Here's everything you need to know about Dewan's plant-based eating habits.

    Dewan said she's not a fan of dieting but instead chooses to simply eat healthily

    43820640_308682293061388_6480315760191326124_n

    "I consider eating healthy a way of life because I feel better, plain and simple," she told People magazine. "I'm not a fan of dieting, which is why I choose to eat healthy most of the time. I keep it in balance, so I don't have to crash diet. When I want to splurge I allow myself and don't beat myself up — I just make a plan to eat extra healthy the next day or work out."

    She's been a vegetarian for most of her life

    jenna dewan

    Dewan said she eats a plant-based diet as often as possible, but switches between strict veganism and vegetarianism. "I eat mostly vegan, but I'm very accommodating, maybe because I've lived with a man for 11 years who's not vegetarian," she told Health magazine.

    She hasn't eaten meat since she watched a documentary about slaughterhouses when she was a pre-teen and told Women's Health that "it just stuck. I feel good about [vegetarianism] morally and physically."

    She added, however, that she "went back and forth" for a brief period but ultimately decided that meat wasn't for her. "I stopped being a vegetarian, but it didn't work for my body," she explained in a video on her YouTube channel. "I felt sluggish and I didn't feel as light and energetic."

    Read more: 10 things you're getting wrong about going vegetarian

    Dewan's typical day includes three healthy plant-based meals and whole fruits at snack time

    Jenna Dewan

    Per People magazine, Dewan consumes approximately 1400 calories per day through a variety of vegetables and plant-based proteins.

    For breakfast, she'll start with a green smoothie— she likes Kimberly Snyder's Glowing Green Smoothie— or she'll make her own and beef it up with cod liver oil, black sesame seeds, coriander, parsley, or spirulina.

    "I do green smoothies. I drink them every morning," she explained in a video on her YouTube channel. "It's great fiber, you get your veggies right off the bat. It's great for picky eaters."

    Lunch is quinoa, hummus, and a tomato and cucumber salad dressed with olive oil, lemon juice, and salt and pepper. Alternatively, she might do a tabouli salad for lunch. "I'm part Lebanese … so I grew up with tabouli. It's my favorite," she told Women's Health. She added that she's a fan of meal-prepping: "I like to make things that will keep for a couple of days, and I can just grab and go."

    Dinner is a zesty quinoa bowl with taco-style toppings, though she told Women's Health that she'll order veggie sushi if she goes out to dinner.

    She also drinks two liters of water per day and typically snacks on whole pieces of fruit throughout the day, but told InStyle magazine, "I always love hummus, and I always have some kind of fruit on me. There are these Luna bars that I really love that I always have in the car. It's like emergency food."

    She says her idea cheat meal includes french fries.

    Visit INSIDER's homepage for more.

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    NOW WATCH: This mind-melting thought experiment of Einstein's reveals how to manipulate time


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    donald trump jerome powell

    • President Donald Trump laid into the Federal Reserve and Fed Chairman Jerome Powell once again.
    • "So far, I'm not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay. Not even a little bit," Trump said, using Powell's nickname.
    • Trump also blamed the Fed for the layoffs at General Motors and the stock market's recent wobbles.

    President Donald Trump continued to point the finger at the Federal Reserve for any and all bad economic news during an interview with The Washington Post published Tuesday.

    The president blamed the Fed's interest-rate hikes for the recent stock-market wobbles, as well as General Motors' big round of layoffs and factory-closure announcement, according to The Post.

    "I'm doing deals, and I’m not being accommodated by the Fed," Trump said. "They're making a mistake because I have a gut, and my gut tells me more sometimes than anybody else’s brain can ever tell me."

    Trump also used the opportunity to once again blast Fed Chairman Jerome "Jay" Powell.

    "So far, I'm not even a little bit happy with my selection of Jay. Not even a little bit," the president said. "And I’m not blaming anybody, but I’m just telling you I think that the Fed is way off base with what they’re doing."

    The Fed began a slow and steady interest-rate hiking cycle in December 2015, well before Trump took office, because of the relative strength of the US economy.

    But ever since the stock market started stumbling in recent months, and the economy has shown some signs of strain, Trump has blasted the rate hikes as the source of America's economic ills. The president has even gone so far as to call the Fed's rate hikes "loco" and said in Tuesday's interview that "the Fed is a much bigger problem than China."

    Trump has also singled out Powell on multiple occasions for continuing to support the rate hikes. In fact, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is reportedly now the subject of Trump's ire because Mnuchin supported Powell during the selection process.

    While the stock market's uneven footing is due to a variety of factors, one of those being the rate hikes, the GM announcement appears to be unrelated. The automaker announced that four US plants in three states would be idled because of falling demand and industry trends moving away from the products made at those factories.

    Trump's attacks raise decades-old fears

    Trump's attacks on the Fed generally worry economists and other market watchers because the abuse harkens back to President Richard Nixon's pressure on then-Fed Chairman Arthur Burns.

    Read more:Trump keeps bashing the Fed, calling the central bank 'loco' and 'crazy.' An ugly economic lesson from the Nixon administration shows why his criticism is so worrying

    Though done in private, Nixon pressured Burns to keep interest rates low before the 1972 election in order to keep the economy humming. In basic economic theory, the Fed's interest rates make it more expensive for companies and consumers to borrow money. This helps fulfill the Fed's goal of keeping inflation low, but also slows economic activity.

    Nixon was successful in convincing Burns to keep rates low, which helped to contribute to the disastrous stagflation of the 1970s and damaged the US economy in the long run.

    While Trump's pressure may not be as tactful as Nixon's — and may in fact backfire — the specter of the incident still looms large over president-Fed interactions.

    SEE ALSO: Trump threatens to slash GM subsidies after the automaker announced layoffs, factory closings

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    NOW WATCH: Fox News' Harris Faulkner is the only black woman in cable news with a daily show: 'It's a tremendous amount of responsibility'


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    princess dog crown spoiled

    • Some individuals use their wills to leave money to their pets.
    • In some cases, these pets have been left acres of land.
    • Some pets have been given millions of dollars upon their owner's death. 

    Leaving millions of dollars to a pet is a pretty grand gesture that's been done many times over the years.

    From rich dogs who own villas to a cat that walked with millions when its owner died, here are eight pets that inherited large fortunes from their owners. 

    The "Star Trek" heiress gave her pets more than $3 million.

    Majel Barrett-Roddenberry, the widow of "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry, reportedly left £2.65 million (roughly $3.3 million) to her pets when she died in 2008.

    According to the Daily Mail, Barrett-Roddenberry also left £662,000 to her housekeeper who would "be allowed to" continue living in the family's mansion and taking care of the various cats and dogs that lived there. 



    The world’s richest dog is a German shepherd named Gunther.

    According to BBC News, Gunther III, a German shepherd, inherited $65 million when his owner, the late German countess Karlotta Liebenstein died in 1992. The humans who managed his doggy estate eventually invested Gunther's money and turned it into $375 million which was passed onto Gunther’s son, Gunther IV. 

    Gunther IV and his team of handlers have used that money to snatch up mansions and villas all over the world (including Madonna's) and now Gunther IV is actually considered the world’s richest dog.

     



    Instead of leaving money to his children, a man left his entire fortune to his black cat.

    According to Guinness World Records, the richest cat in the world is a black cat named Blackie who inherited £7 million (about $12.5 million) in 1988 when his owner Ben Rea — an antiques dealer — left a good portion of his fortune to his beloved pet.

    In his will, Rea left nothing for his family and he gave additional donations to several cat-related charities, instructing them to look after Blackie.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    earth rise moon apollo 10 nasa

    • The last time NASA landed a spacecraft on the moon was in December 1972.
    • The US space agency said it's about to announce "moon partnerships" with American companies to return to the lunar surface.
    • NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine claimed the new moon missions will occur "sooner than you think!"
    • NASA is withholding details of the announcement until Thursday, but Business Insider has independently confirmed some information.

    If NASA's stunning landing of a car-sized robot on Mars didn't already whet your appetite for space exploration this week, mark your calendar for 2 p.m. EST on Thursday.

    That's when NASA plans to give an update about a program that aims to land privately developed spacecraft on the moon.

    "We are announcing new moon partnerships with American companies," Jim Bridenstine, NASA's administrator, tweeted on Tuesday. "The US is returning to the surface of the moon, and we're doing it sooner than you think!"

    NASA hasn't landed anything on the moon since Apollo 17 in December 1972, the final mission of the agency's crewed-lunar-exploration program. (The agency has, however, crashed probes into the moon to study the composition of its soil.)

    The space agency has been working on plans to build a "Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway": a space station to be built in the vicinity of the moon some time in the 2020s. But Business Insider has learned that Thursday's announcement is tied to a more imminent effort to explore the moon and, by extension, support NASA's larger goals with its gateway.

    "Working with US companies is the next step to achieving long-term scientific study and human exploration of the moon and Mars," NASA said in a press release.

    What NASA might announce on Thursday

    astrobotic technology peregrine robotic moon lander spacecraft

    NASA has provided few details about its announcement but said "future partners" will be named. Each of the 11 small companies to be named will be eligible to compete for millions of dollars in NASA contracts.

    Business Insider has independently confirmed that a company called Astrobotic Technology will be one of those partners, but an Astrobotic employee said they can't reveal specifics until Thursday

    Space-industry sources also told Business Insider that the announcement will flesh out the future of the agency's Commercial Lunar Payload Services program (CLPS).

    In many ways, CLPS resembles NASA's Commercial Crew Program, which uses billions of dollars to coax private companies (like SpaceX and Boeing) into developing new spaceships capable of ferrying astronauts to and from orbit. Similarly, CLPS hopes to encourage smaller companies to develop 1,100- to 2,200-pound robotic landers that can deliver NASA's scientific payloads to the moon's surface.

    CLPS missions may launch and land as early as 2019, according to NASA. NASA may also use the competition to solicit much larger landers designed to take people to and from the lunar surface in the late 2020s.

    Astrobotic formed in 2007 during the Google Lunar X Prize, a $20 million competition that intended to spur private exploration of the moon. The contest shuttered in 2018 without a winner, but Astrobotic continued developing a small lunar lander called Peregrine.

    In March, Astrobotic was reportedly working with United Launch Alliance (ULA) to find room on a rocket that could fly Peregrine to the moon sometime in 2020. Space News reported in May that Astrobotic was preparing to bring 12 payloads to the lunar surface.

    Then in August, Astrobotic received $10 million from NASA to create a "low-cost, reliable, high-performance, stand-alone" system to land a commercial lunar spacecraft on the moon. The funding was part of $44 million worth of awards NASA gave out to companies developing "tipping point" technologies for space exploration.

    Who else might be involved?

    new glenn rocket launch flight moon earth illustration blue origin

    NASA's list of people scheduled to participate in the Thursday announcement includes Bridenstine, Thomas Zurbuchen (the agency's associate administrator for science missions), Stan Love (a NASA astronaut), Andrea Mosie (the manager of the Apollo sample laboratory), Barbara Cohen (a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter scientist), and students involved in the First Robotics Competition.

    If "tipping point" awards are any indication of the other companies that may be named as "future partners," that list may include Blue Origin, the aerospace company founded by Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos.

    Blue Origin took home $13 million in NASA cash in the "tipping point" awards — funding that was earmarked for maturing "critical technologies that enable precision and soft landing on the moon."

    In October, Blue Origin said it's "in the conceptual design phase" of building a large lunar lander called "Blue Moon." The company is also creating a reusable rocket system called New Glenn, which may take flight in 2020.

    Blue Origin did not immediately respond to Business Insider's requests for comment, and SpaceX — which could conceivably use its Falcon Heavy rocket to send large payloads to the moon— did not respond in time for publication.

    Another company that could be named as a new NASA partner is ULA, which received $13.9 million in the "tipping point" awards. About $10 million of that sum was intended to help ULA develop systems that would enable long-duration moon missions.

    Frontier Aerospace Corporation also got $1.9 million from NASA to develop rocket engines to help Astrobotic's lander.

    Watch NASA's announcement live online

    The agency plans to stream its briefing via NASA TV, which anyone can watch on YouTube.

    You can tune in using the player embedded below starting at 2 p.m. EST on Thursday.


    If you're having trouble watching the feed above, try NASA TV on the agency's website.

    SEE ALSO: NASA's new Mars mission just landed — and it could reveal why Earth is habitable but the red planet is not

    DON'T MISS: NASA and big brands share some out-of-this-world tales. Hear them on Business Insider's new podcast 'Household Name.'

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    gilmore girls

    The original "Gilmore Girls" series ran for seven years and seven seasons from 2000 to 2007.

    The titular Gilmore girls Lorelai (Lauren Graham), Rory (Alexis Bledel), and Emily (Kelly Bishop) easily stole the show episode in and episode out.

    But the show also captivated fans with its charming hometown feel and an ensemble cast of quirky characters. Without every member of the show, it wouldn't have been what it was.

    Most of the characters stuck around for all seven seasons, although some did depart earlier when their storylines had run their course.

    With that in mind, here's how every character started and ended the show in its original seven seasons.

    Lorelai Gilmore worked hard to get her career and romantic life where she wanted them to be.

    First seen: season one, episode one as a coffee-loving single mom working as a manager of an inn.

    Last seen: season seven, episode 22 as a coffee-loving single mom who now owns her own inn and found love with the man who once just served her coffee.



    Rory Gilmore graduated from an ivy-league school and landed a killer job.

    First seen: season one, episode one as a shy high schooler still trying to figure out what she wanted from life.

    Last seen: season seven, episode 22 as a Yale graduate about to go work as a reporter on Barack Obama's campaign.



    Luke Danes found the love of his life.

    First seen: season one, episode one as a cranky diner owner who was clearly Lorelai's soulmate even though neither of them could see it yet.

    Last seen: season seven, episode 22 as a slightly less cranky diner owner who finally realized Lorelai was the missing piece in his life.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    romaine lettuce field

    • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a multistate outbreak of E. coli that has sickened at least 65 people across the US and Canada.
    • Investigators are zeroing in on the romaine-growing region in central and northern California as the source of the outbreak. Romaine lettuce that was not grown in California has been deemed safe to eat.
    • This is the third time in less than 12 months that romaine lettuce has been deemed dangerous to eat.
    • The problem shows how difficult it can be to control a supply of fresh, uncooked produce that touches water and dirt, and changes hands countless times before it reaches consumers.
    • Still, fresh produce is not the deadliest source of pathogens that we eat. That prize goes to meat.  

    Salad eaters, rejoice: romaine lettuce is safe to eat again, as long as the leaves aren't from California.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced last week that it is investigating an E. coli outbreak that spans at least 12 US states and three Canadian provinces. So far, at least 65 people have gotten sick. 

    The CDC originally warned the public not to eat any romaine lettuce, just two days ahead of Thanksgiving. Simply "throw it away," officials advised.

    But investigators have now zeroed in on some end-of-season Californian lettuce from the state's Central Coast growing region as the outbreak's culprit.

    "Romaine lettuce that was harvested outside of the Central Coast growing regions of northern and central California does not appear to be related to the current outbreak," the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced Monday. "Hydroponically- and greenhouse-grown romaine also does not appear to be related to the current outbreak."

    Since it can be tough for consumers to know exactly where their lettuce was grown, the FDA is also proposing some new voluntary romaine salad labeling guidelines. The FDA's proposed labels would include information about where the lettuce was grown and when it was harvested.

    The revision comes as romaine harvesting season winds down in central and northern California, and picks up in lettuce-growing states like Arizona and Florida, as well as Mexico.

    Lettuce-related outbreaks are starting to feel like a wintertime tradition. Seven months ago, another E. coli outbreak in romaine from Arizona killed five people and sickened nearly 200 more. A year ago, one person was killed in another leafy-green outbreak that made 25 people ill. Here's why this keeps happening.

    There's only one way that romaine gets contaminated with E. coli

    romaine farmers

    E. coli is a broad species of gut bacteria (you have some of it in your intestines right now), but the strains that public-health investigators have discovered in sick people's feces recently are not the kind that keep us healthy. Instead, the E. coli in question — called O157:H7 — can make people develop bloody diarrhea, stomach cramps, vomiting, and kidney failure. In severe cases, the gut poisoning can kill. It's most dangerous for elderly adults and children.

    An E. coli outbreak in lettuce can only mean one thing: The leaves have poop on them. The feces could come from livestock in a farm close to where lettuce grows, or they could come from washing or watering the lettuce in water that's not clean. The contamination could also come from one of the countless people who touch the lettuce before it reaches consumers' mouths.

    Read More: What is E. coli? 

    It's pretty easy for bits of contaminated soil or water to get lodged into the folds of lettuce leaves. Although washing your produce at home can help reduce the chances of infection, it won't eliminate your risk of getting sick. That's probably why fresh produce accounts for nearly half of all foodborne illnesses in the US. 

    E coli O157:H7

    An easy way to reduce your risk of getting sick, though, is to cut down on the number of hands that touch your leaves before you eat them.

    Tim Richter, a romaine farmer in Puyallup, Washington, told the Associated Press that he encourages his customers to buy their own romaine heads and then wash and chop them at home, rather than buying pre-chopped bags of lettuce. That way, the leaves touch fewer hands, knives, and countertops as they go from soil to table. (Of course the cautionary step won't help prevent infection if lettuce was already contaminated in the field.)

    romaine lettuce growing

    There's probably nothing inherently bacteria-prone about romaine lettuce as compared to other fresh leafy greens. Outbreaks probably just affect more people and are easier to notice when tied to a leaf that's commonly consumed. Lettuce is one of the most common veggies on American plates, and romaine's share of the market has been growing steadily since it was introduced in the late '80s. Romaine and leaf lettuce account for well over 60% of per capita lettuce consumption across the US, according to the USDA.

    "I think that the issue isn't that there's more unsafe food," FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on the day the outbreak was announced. "I think what's happening is that we have better technology than ever before to link outbreaks of human illness to a common pathogen."

    Uncooked leaves are not the deadliest thing on the menu 

    People infected with the O157:H7 strain of E. coli can develop "severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea, which may become bloody within 24 hours," according to the Merck Manual.  

    "People usually have severe abdominal pain and diarrhea many times a day. They also often feel an urge to defecate but may not be able to," the manual says. In severe cases, the illness can lead to kidney failure. 

    There's typically no fever involved, and there isn't much that otherwise healthy people can do about the infection besides staying hydrated. It can take anywhere from one to eight days for the illness to pass. 

    salad packaging yuma arizona

    Fresh produce is the most common source of food contamination, but food poisoning from meat and poultry is more deadly.

    Taken together, meat and poultry account for 29% of the foodborne illnesses that kill people, while produce (fruit and vegetables combined) accounts for 23% of deaths. 

    In fact, veggies are not even the worst source of E. coli infections — beef's track record is equally bad. Vegetable row crops (mostly leafy greens) and beef each account for roughly 40% of E. coli cases across the country, according to a 2013 CDC report.

    Chicken and other poultry can also get people really sick — the birds are commonly a source of listeria and salmonella infections. During Thanksgiving, a salmonella investigation was underway for raw turkey that sickened more than 160 people and killed at least one.

    romaine salad e coli

    The good thing about meat is that correct preparation involves an easy "kill step"— cooking it to a high temperature ensures you won't sick. But there isn't a step like that for fresh greens. That's why the CDC urges travelers not to eat fresh salad or unpeeled fruits in developing countries, where night soil (i.e. human manure) might be used as fertilizer, and water used to rinse fruits and veggies may not be clean enough to drink.

    Fortunately, these contamination concerns are less of an issue in the US. Americans consume, on average, nearly 25 pounds of lettuce per person each year. So a couple dozen cases of food poisoning this fall (while miserable for those infected) are still a drop in the proverbial salad bowl.

    SEE ALSO: An E. coli outbreak from romaine lettuce has sickened 50 people — here's how to avoid getting sick

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    NOW WATCH: RANKED: The 10 healthiest leafy greens you should be putting in your salad


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