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The latest news from Business Insider
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    KimKanyeTaylor

    Celebrity rivalries are as much a part of Hollywood as red carpets and the Oscars.

    The late night feud between David Letterman and Jay Leno lasted for years. There were Katherine Heigl's diva antics with her "Grey's Anatomy" coworkers. Then, of course, there was an epic chicken grease fight between Sylvester Stallone and Richard Gere that came to blows. 

    Whether it's backstabbing, man-stealing, or social-media hating, some of the squabbles between these stars have been explosive and very public.

    Here's a look at the 20 most heated celebrity feuds of all time.

    Paris Hilton vs. Nicole Richie

    Childhood best friends Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie dominated reality TV when they both starred together on Fox's "The Simple Life" in 2003. But at the height of their fame, the two were suddenly at war.

    “It’s no big secret that Nicole and I are no longer friends,” Hilton said in a statement to press in April 2005. “Nicole knows what she did and that’s all I’m ever going to say about it.”

    According to People Magazine, Richie was jealous of the attention Hilton was getting from the media, angry that she wasn't invited to some of Hilton's events, and that she wasn't included in Hilton's appearance on NBC's "Saturday Night Live" in February 2005. So Richie reportedly had a party to celebrate Hilton's appearance on the sketch show, followed by a screening of Hilton's notorious 2003 sex tape.  

    “Paris was very hurt,” said People's source. “She loves Nicole, but believes she is owed an apology.” 

    Since then, the two have made up and even filmed two more seasons of "The Simple Life."Richie told Andy Cohen on Bravo's "Watch What Happens Live"in 2014 that even though she and Hilton don't talk everyday, she considers her one of her very good friends. 

    "The short answer is I haven't spoken to her in awhile," Richie said. "But we are very good friends and I love her and love her family and have a lot of respect for her."



    Sylvester Stallone vs. Richard Gere

    Sylvester Stallone and Richard Gere were set to star together in the 1974 film "The Lords of Flatbush" until the two didn't get along on-set. Gere's role would later be re-cast. 

    "We never hit it off,"Sylvester said in 2006. "He would strut around in his oversized motorcycle jacket like he was the baddest knight at the round table."

    The drama would get increasingly messy – literally. The two actors apparently also got into a physical fight over spilled chicken grease. 

    "I was eating a hot dog and [Richard] climbs in with a half a chicken covered in mustard with grease nearly dripping out of the aluminum wrapper," Sylvester said in the same interview. "I said, 'That thing is going to drip all over the place.' He said, 'Don’t worry about it.' I said, 'If it gets on my pants. you’re gonna know about it.' He proceeds to bite into the chicken and a small, greasy river of mustard lands on my thigh. I elbowed him in the side of the head and basically pushed him out of the car."



    Martha Stewart vs. Gwyneth Paltrow

    These lifestyle gurus have been going at it ever since 2014. It all started when Martha Stewart slammed Gwyneth Paltrow for starting her own lifestyle business, Goop.

    "She's a movie star. If she were confident in her acting, she wouldn't be trying to be Martha Stewart," she told Porter magazine.

    The drama didn't seem to slow down when Stewart posted a pie recipe called "conscious coupling," which was featured in Martha Stewart's Living Magazine shortly after Paltrow filed for divorce from Chris Martin, calling the break a "conscious uncoupling." A month later, Paltrow posted a similar recipe for "jailbird cake,"  presumably mocking Stewart's time spent in prison back in 2004 for fraud charges. 



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    school india

    The INSIDER Summary:

    • Education is a crucial resource for kids all over the world.
    • Here's what schools look like in 20 different countries.


    Nobel Prize winner and author Malala Yousafzai wrote that "One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.”

    In some parts of the world, students have to overcome challenging circumstances to even get to class amid war, political unrest, and poverty, while others simply hop on a yellow school bus that stops on their suburban corner.

    Despite the differences between cramped classrooms without electricity and private institutions with pressed uniforms, the power of learning can help kids all over the world reach their full potential. 

    Here's what it's like to go to school in 20 different countries. 

    Iraq

    Pupils are dismissed from their classroom at an elementary school in eastern Mosul.



    China

    A biology teacher live broadcasts her course in a classroom to students at home during a polluted day.



    India

    At this school assembly, students offer prayers to their parents during an event called Matru-Pitru Puja, or Parents Worship.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    FILE PHOTO - Anthony Scaramucci, Founder and Co-Managing Partner at SkyBridge Capital, speaks during the opening remarks during the SALT conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. on May 17, 2017.  REUTERS/Richard Brian/File Photo

    White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci slammed White House chief strategist Steve Bannon in a call with New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza on Wednesday night.

    “I’m not Steve Bannon, I’m not trying to suck my own c--k ... I’m not trying to build my own brand off the f--king strength of the President. I’m here to serve the country,” Scaramucci said.

    Scaramucci had called Lizza after the reporter tweeted that a source had told him Scaramucci was having dinner with President Trump, Melania Trump, Sean Hannity, and former Fox News executive Bill Shine.

    Scaramucci pressed Lizza to reveal his source on the report, before launching into a tirade where he threatened to fire the entire communications department over the leak.

    He further accused chief of staff Reince Priebus of leaking his financial disclosure form to Politico. The Politico reporter revealed that the form was public information on Thursday.

    Scaramucci then launched into the screed against Bannon, saying that unlike him he isn't interested in media attention.

    Read the rest of the unhinged report at the New Yorker here»

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: 'Where is Sean?': Things got awkward when April Ryan asked Sarah Sanders why Spicer didn’t attend the WH briefing


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    Anthony Scaramucci

    Anthony Scaramucci promised a massive White House purge in an expletive-laden interview with The New Yorker published Thursday.

    Scaramucci, the recently appointed White House communications director, unloaded to New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza about White House chief of staff Reince Priebus, saying "he'll be asked to resign very shortly" and promising that virtually everyone in the White House communications shop will "all be fired by me."

    Scaramucci called Lizza on Wednesday night because he was angered by a tweet from the reporter earlier in the day. That tweet cited a "senior White House official" who said Scaramucci was having dinner at the White House with President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, former Fox News executive Bill Shine, and Fox News host Sean Hannity.

    "Who leaked that to you?" Scaramucci asked, to which Lizza said he could not reveal the source.

    Scaramucci then promised to fire the whole White House communications staff.

    "What I'm going to do is, I will eliminate everyone in the comms team and we'll start over," he said, adding "I ask these guys not to leak anything and they can't help themselves. You're an American citizen, this is a major catastrophe for the American country. So I'm asking you as an American patriot to give me a sense of who leaked it."

    After Lizza again said he would not confirm who leaked it, Scaramucci said he would "fire every one of them."

    "And then you haven't protected anybody, so the entire place will be fired over the next two weeks," he said, adding "they'll all be fired by me."

    "I fired one guy the other day," he continued. "I have three to four people I'll fire tomorrow. I’ll get to the person who leaked that to you. Reince Priebus — if you want to leak something — he'll be asked to resign very shortly."

    Scaramucci called Priebus a "f------ paranoid schizophrenic, a paranoiac."

    He then spoke as if he were imitating Priebus.

    "'Oh, Bill Shine is coming in. Let me leak the f------ thing and see if I can c--k-block these people the way I c--k-blocked Scaramucci for six months.'"

    Scaramucci had become incensed at Priebus the night before after a Politico report detailed his financial disclosure, which was publicly available from Scaramucci's stint at the Export-Import Bank. Scaramucci, who did not know that at the time, had tweeted that the report was illegally leaked and said he was going to contact the FBI and the Justice Department. He also tagged Priebus in the tweet and wrote #swamp.

    "They're trying to resist me, but it's not going to work," Scaramucci wrote. "I've done nothing wrong on my financial disclosures, so they're going to have to go f--- themselves."

    Scaramucci then turned to White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, saying that unlike the former Breitbart News chairman, he was not interested in media attention.

    "I'm not Steve Bannon, I'm not trying to suck my own c---,” Scaramucci said. "I'm not trying to build my own brand off the f------ strength of the president. I'm here to serve the country."

    He transitioned back to Priebus, saying that the chief of staff would launch a campaign against him, in addition to soon resigning.

    "He didn't get the hint that I was reporting directly to the president," he said. "And I said to the president 'here are the four or five things that he will do to me.'"

    "What I want to do is I want to f------ kill all the leakers and I want to get the president's agenda on track so we can succeed for the American people," he continued.

    He insisted the leaks would be "cleaned up very shortly" because "I nailed these guys" and "I've got digital fingerprints on everything they've done through the FBI and the f------" Justice Department.'

    Thursday morning, when Lizza appeared on CNN to discuss the Wednesday-night drama, Scaramucci called into host Chris Cuomo's morning show and referenced the conversation with Lizza. He said that the reason he mentioned Priebus in that Wednesday night tweet that soon went viral was not because he was suggesting Priebus leaked but because he wanted Priebus to help discover the leakers.

    "He's the chief of staff, he's responsible for understanding and uncovering and helping me do that inside the White House, which is why I put that tweet out last night," Scaramucci said.

    But in that interview on CNN's "New Day," Scaramucci also said "if Reince wants to explain that he's not a leaker, let him do that."

    "I can speak for my own actions," Scaramucci said. "He's gonna need to speak for his own actions."

    Scaramucci also said he didn't know "if the relationship with Reince is repairable" and "that's up to the president."

    Priebus' days seem increasingly numbered. As BuzzFeed reported Thursday, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway has privately told people that the chief of staff is "gone" and that Priebus is trying to figure out his plan. As a source recalled to BuzzFeed, Conway said White House staffers connected to the Republican National Committee, which Priebus used to run, are going to be ousted, and that the Trump administration is "going back to Trump loyalists."

    Meanwhile, during Thursday's press briefing, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders — who replaced her predecessor Sean Spicer, himself a former RNC official — declined to express confidence in Priebus.

    Scaramucci took to Twitter Thursday evening to respond to The New Yorker article.

    "I sometimes use colorful language,"he posted. "I will refrain in this arena but not give up the passionate fight for @realDonaldTrump's agenda. #MAGA"

    SEE ALSO: Trump is quietly moving at a furious pace to secure 'the single most important legacy' of his administration

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: 'You're inflaming everybody!': Watch reporters clash with Sanders over press coverage


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    • rachael rayViacom is unlikely to buy Scripps Networks, and that's a good thing.
    • The beleaguered cable company needs to make a transformative, digital-centric move.
    • The MTV-owner could instead steer billions toward companies like BuzzFeed, Spotify or even Roku.

    Up until late Wednesday it looked as though Viacom was very serious about acquiring Scripps Networks, which is valued at upwards of $11 billion. But now the Wall Street Journal is reporting that Viacom is out of the Scripps sweepstakes, leaving Discovery Communications alone in the bidding.

    That's a good thing for Viacom, because there are so many other things it could buy with that kind of money that have the potential to transform its business.

    Reuters had been reporting that Viacom, which owns networks like MTV and Comedy Central, was willing to pay cash for Scripps, owner of networks like Food Network and HGTV. Putting aside whether a company saddled with loads of debt should be spending anywhere near that kind of money, the logic was as follows:

    • A Scripps/Viacom combo would help the entity negotiate with cable distributors like Comcast to make sure it gets distribution and good rates for its channels. Cable companies like Comcast pay networks like MTV a few bucks to carry them. Power players like ESPN can pull in over $9 per sub.
    • Plus, the portfolio of networks in a Scripps/Viacom buffet would make the company a must buy with advertisers, as WSJ noted.

    In other words, Viacom was looking at Scripps as a way to shore up that sweet dual revenue cable model.

    Here's the thing. Why double down on a business that is getting hit on two fronts? People are cutting the cord at an accelerated pace. And they are not watching live ad-supported TV at the level they used to. 

    Owning a bunch more cable channels than you used to isn't going to change either trend.

    Bob BakishViacom CEO Bob Bakish has been credited with unveiling a very disciplined strategy earlier this year when he announced that Viacom would focus it's energies on just six core channels, rather than a few dozen. Sounds very reasonable. But boil it down, and the plan he laid out was basically, "we're going to focus on linear TV, just not as much of it."

    That's coming at a time when Viacom's youth-oriented network like Nickelodeon and MTV are feeling the pain of consumer media habits shifting more than others. It's unlikely that hoping for the next "Jersey Shore"-sized hit is going to change that. And yes, adding networks like HGTV to the mix bring an attractive audience. But you could argue that the kind of programming that Scripps networks specializes in, such as instructional food shows and DIY project shows, are the kind that easily get dropped from the average TV binger's diet.

    Plus, as Recode's Ed Lee noted, that content of content is all over the web for free.

    Thus, Viacom doesn't need to expand its fading cable empire. It needs to prep itself for the coming digital war. There are so many ways it could jumpstart such an effort with $11 billion, or far less. Such as:

    1) Buy BuzzFeed. Reports are that the BuzzFeed turned down Disney a few years ago. And since then NBCUniversal has invested in the digital media company, so this may not be a realistic option. But its worth a discussion. In the near term, BuzzFeed's not nearly as lucrative as Scripps, but the company has a connection with a new generation of consumers and has shown a remarkable ability to launch new brands like Tasty seemingly overnight. Exactly the kinds of things Viacom should be doing.

    2) Buy Spotify. This was BTIG Research media analyst Rich Greenfield's suggestion to Business Insider. That would give Viacom a direct-to-consumer subscription business that is music based. "That's the perfect fit," he said. There is the matter of Spotify's $13 billion valuation and pending IPO. But if you're going to splurge ...

    3) Buy a bunch of digital media companies. Everyone in digital media is pivoting to video and wondering about consolidation and where to go next. That seems like the right conditions for a shopping spree. What would it cost for Viacom to snatch up Pop Sugar, Mic, Defy Media or Tastemade? Surely not $11 billion. You could maybe even collect all four. Throw in Cheddar for good measure.

    None of these would solve the ratings or distribution challenges. But it would help get the company started on how to program and connect with the mobile-centric generation that is key to Viacom's future.

    Brian Sugar4) Disrupt yourself. There's been lots of talk of Viacom joining forces with other cable companies to explore a cheaper, skinnier bundle for non sports fans. Do that! But in the meantime, why not launch your own direct to consumer Nickelodeon? You could call it Nickelodeon Go. That might annoy some of your distribution partners. But Viacom is already at odds with some of them. Otherwise, they're conceding this arena to Google, which has YouTube Kids. People will pay for Paw Patrol.

    spongebob squarepants nickelodeon ad 5) Incubate you're own newbie brands.

    Look at what CNN has done with its feel good social video brand Great Big Story, which was born on Facebook and is now aspiring to become an "over the top" cable net. That's only cost CNN $40 million! Where's Viacom's version of that?

    6) Pull an Otter. As part of a joint venture known as Otter Media, AT&T has invested in digital video brands like Fullscreen and Crunchyroll, fostering their growth without having to run them or own them outright. Now the New York Post says Otter could be worth $1 billion. Seems like there's a playbook to follow here for Viacom.

    7) Pull an Axel Springer. Similarly, the German media giant has invested in a slew of early stage US digital content companies, like Thrillist, NowThis and Mic. The dual benefit is that the company's traditional media businesses theoretically get to learn from the newer contenders, and if one hits it big, Axel gets a payoff. And who knows, if you like one, you can buy the whole thing (see Insider, Business).

    8) Plunge into ad tech. This would be a major curveball. But one thing Viacom is credited with is being ahead of the pack in terms of data-driven TV ad targeting. What if the company purchased video ad tech players like Innovid or Videology and try to become the industry leader if and when TV ads are delivered dynamically to TV sets and mobile devices much like targeted web ads?

    xfinity tv app roku9) Buy Roku. Another left turn. But Roku is actually trending ahead of Google's Chromecast and Apple TV in terms of the devices people use to stream content on TV, according to eMarketer. The company is talking about a billion dollar IPO. What if Viacom could take advantage of Roku's real estate (the interface many use to navigate their TVs) and also the ads that Roku delivers to many TV apps?

    10) Buy Snapchat. Or sell to Snapchat. Neither will probably work. But hey.

    11) Sell to Google or Amazon. We all will someday.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Heard in Cannes: World's leading marketing execs told us how they feel about the power of Google and Facebook


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    Jeff Sessions

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions called President Donald Trump's weeklong rant against him 'hurtful,' but qualified his remark by noting that Trump's job entitled him to do so.

    Sessions addressed Trump's attack in an interview with Fox News' Tucker Carlson on Thursday night.

    "Well ... it's kind of hurtful but the President of the United States is a strong leader," Sessions said. "He is determined to move this country in the direction that he believes it needs to go to make it great again."

    "And he has had a lot of criticism and he's steadfast determined to get his job done and he wants all of us to do our job and that's what I intend to do," Sessions continued.

    Sessions has been a frequent target of Trump's scorn in recent days, following an interview with The New York Times last week in which the president expressed disappointment that Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation. Trump then launched into a multiday campaign against Sessions on Twitter, where he referred to Sessions as "beleaguered" and criticized his decisions at the Justice Department.

    "Attorney General Jeff Sessions has taken a VERY weak position on Hillary Clinton crimes (where are E-mails & DNC server) & Intel leakers," Trump tweeted on Tuesday.

    Trump declined to speculate on the future of Sessions' position as the nation's top law-enforcement official during a Tuesday news conference.

    "I'm very disappointed with the attorney general, but we will see what happens," Trump said. "Time will tell. Time will tell."

    SEE ALSO: http://www.businessinsider.com/defense-against-trump-attack-jeff-sessions-2017-7

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Here's the TV segment that prompted Trump's vicious Twitter attack on Mika Brzezinski


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    bii vr hmd shipments forecast 2016

    This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider's premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

    The virtual reality (VR) market has made significant strides throughout 2016.

    New VR headsets like the Oculus Rift and the HTC Vive debuted amid great consumer anticipation, while VR content launches kept pace, with Batman: Arkham VR and Chair In A Room garnering encouraging download totals.

    At the same time, industry groups and conferences brought developers, investors, and content producers together, helping to further ramp up buzz in this nascent space.   

    BI Intelligence forecasts shipments of VR headsets to spike by 1047% year-over-year (YoY) to 8.2 million in 2016. This growth will help propel the virtual reality space to exceed $1 billion in revenue for the first time, according to research by Deloitte. Powering that growth is an estimated 271% increase in investment in AR (augmented reality) and VR companies from 2015, according to estimates from CB Insights.

    But while 2016 has indeed been an important year for the VR market, it hasn’t necessarily been a big one — at least not compared to its future growth potential.

    VR headset shipments will continue to grow in the years ahead, driven by the introduction of new content that will appeal to a broad swath of users. 

    In a new report, BI Intelligence explores the highly fragmented and volatile VR market that emerged in 2016. It lays out the future growth potential in numerous key VR hardware categories, as driven by major VR platforms. And it examines consumer sentiment and developer excitement for VR, presenting which headset categories and platforms are most poised for success in the near- to mid-term.

    Here are some key takeaways from the report:

    • This has been an important foundational year for the VR market. New hardware and content have brought more options to market to appeal to a wider set of consumers. 
    • But the growth seen this year is merely a foreshadowing of the future. The highly fragmented VR market today will eventually narrow as the market grows and matures.
    • After considerable progress in 2016, the VR market is ripe for transformation in 2017. Developers, consumers, investors, and hardware makers have a host of options from which to choose, each with their own strengths and shortcomings.
    • The environment is poised for the first killer VR app to hit the market sometime in 2017, which will be a major catalyst for consumer adoption of VR hardware.
    • Not all headset categories and platforms will emerge as winners in the near future. More immersive headsets that offer the best VR experiences are too expensive for most consumers. Alternately, affordable headsets that rely on smartphones as processors offer sub-par experiences that can induce sickness.

    In full, the report:

    • Identifies the major players in today's VR hardware and platform markets.
    • Estimates future growth of each of the major VR categories.
    • Explores barriers to mass market consumer adoption for each of the VR hardware categories.
    • Considers how developer sentiment is driving the growth of various platforms. 
    • Assesses how the market will shake out over the next five years in terms of size and the success of various VR hardware categories. 

    Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

    1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. »Learn More Now
    2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. » Purchase & Download Now

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    the emoji movie

     

    The INSIDER Summary:

    • Early reviews for "The Emoji Movie" in, none of them are positive.
    • Despite being packed with stars — Sofia Vergara, Patrick Stewart, and T.J. Miller — critics are finding it uninspiring. 
    • Fans are going after the movie's star, T.J. Miller, after he championed the movie in multiple interviews.


    Early reviews for Sony's new animated movie "The Emoji Movie" are starting to hit the web. And, hoo boy, they're bad. With 18 reviews cataloged on Rotten Tomatoes as of this posting, the movie has a score of 0%.

    That means zero critics gave the film a positive review. The "average rating" of the movie is also 1.9/10. 

    emoji movie rotten tomatoes screenshot

    "The Emoji Movie" is about an emoji named Gene (voiced by T.J. Miller) who has multiple expressions and, living in the city of Textopolis, goes on to find his identity. Critics found it uninspiring. "This movie’s 'believe in yourself' message is borne out, in a perverse way, by the very fact that it even exists,"wrote The New York Times. "'The Emoji Movie' is [like] a severely debased 'Inside Out' that takes place inside of a smartphone,"wrote The AV Club.

    The movie's voice cast is filled with stars — Sofía Vergara, Patrick Stewart, and Maya Rudolph are just a few of the people involved — but Miller in particular has been championing the film. In severalinterviews after leaving "Silicon Valley," he said he wanted more time to work on movies like it.

    "I would love to do 'The Emoji Movie' and things like that and have the time to develop animated features,"he told Entertainment Weekly.

    But Miller's abrasive attitude — he told Vulture that women aren't funny because they've been "taught to suppress their sense of humor during their formative years"— have rubbed a lot of people the wrong way. And now they're relishing in his failure.

    "The Emoji Movie" is in theaters July 28.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: 'Where is Sean?': Things got awkward when April Ryan asked Sarah Sanders why Spicer didn’t attend the WH briefing


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    Anthony Scaramucci

    White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci is angry at staff members who he believes have been slowly crippling President Donald Trump's administration with damaging leaks, according to The New Yorker.

    "What I want to do is I want to f-----g kill all the leakers and I want to get the President's agenda on track so we can succeed for the American people," Scaramucci said to New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza in a phone call Wednesday.

    Scaramucci also eluded to knowing who the leakers were, saying that he had information that would lead to their termination.

    "OK, the Mooch showed up a week ago," Scaramucci said, referring to his own nickname. "This is going to get cleaned up very shortly, OK? Because I nailed these guys. I've got digital fingerprints on everything they've done through the FBI and the f-----g Department of Justice."

    Scaramucci also threatened to "eliminate" members of the communications department and "start over."

    "I ask these guys not to leak anything and they can't help themselves," Scaramucci said. "You're an American citizen, this is a major catastrophe for the American country. So I'm asking you as an American patriot to give me a sense of who leaked it."

    "I fired one guy the other day," Scaramucci said. "I have three to four people I'll fire tomorrow."

    SEE ALSO: 'They'll all be fired by me': Scaramucci is hinting at a massive White House purge — and 'paranoid schizophrenic' Priebus is at the top of the list

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: 'Where is Sean?': Things got awkward when April Ryan asked Sarah Sanders why Spicer didn’t attend the WH briefing


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    anthony scaramucci

    Following his expletive-laden phone call with New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza on Wednesday night, White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci said on Twitter that he would hold back on using "colorful language" going forward.

    "I sometimes use colorful language," Scaramucci tweeted. "I will refrain in this arena but not give up the passionate fight for @realDonaldTrump's agenda. #MAGA."

    Scaramucci's tweet follows the explosive conversation where he said he wanted to "f-----g kill all the leakers" who were revealing to the press damaging information about President Donald Trump's administration.

    Scaramucci also went off on White House chief of staff Reince Priebus during the call with Lizza, calling Priebus a "f-----g paranoid schizophrenic, a paranoiac," and fueling the long-standing rumor that the two were at odds with each other in the White House.

    According to several reports, both Priebus and former White House press secretary Sean Spicer were vehemently against Scaramucci's recent hiring. Spicer resigned on the day Scaramucci's new position was announced.

    SEE ALSO: 'They'll all be fired by me': Scaramucci is hinting at a massive White House purge — and 'paranoid schizophrenic' Priebus is at the top of the list

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Watch Jared Kushner speak publicly for the first time since joining Trump's administration


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    Founder/CEO of Dropbox Drew Houston

    Dropbox is inching closer to an IPO and is currently working with Goldman Sachs on the paperwork for an offering, Bloomberg reports.

    The file hosting service, last valued at $10 billion in 2014, is close to hiring Goldman Sachs as a "lead adviser" for an IPO that could happen as early as this year, according to the report. 

    Goldman Sachs declined to comment to Business Insider. Dropbox did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    It was reported in late June that Dropbox was in the market for underwriters, and was set to start interviewing investment banks in July. 

    SEE ALSO: The CEO of Dropbox shares his best advice for his 24-year-old self

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: What it’s like living in North Korea — according to a North Korean defector


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    Donald Trump LGBT rainbow flag

    The Department of Justice filed a brief Wednesday night arguing that a landmark federal law does not prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation.

    The filing occurred in a US Second Circuit Court case, Zarda v. Altitude Express. The case was first brought forward in 2010 by Donald Zarda, a now deceased skydiving instructor, who alleged he was fired because of his sexual orientation, according to The New York Times.

    The DOJ's brief weighed in on whether or not Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Title VII does ban workplace discrimination based on sex, race, color, national origin, and religion.

    Much of the debate about Title VII swirls around whether the word "sex" also pertains to sexual orientation and gender identity.

    Rulings from federal appeals courts are all over the place when it comes to interpretation of the law. In 2000, the Second Circuit Court ruled in the case of Simonton v. Runyon that the law did not cover discrimination based on sexual orientation.

    In April, the Seventh Circuit Court ruled that discrimination based on sexual orientation does violate federal law in the case Hively v. Ivy Community College.

    The DOJ is now reversing the position it held during Barack Obama's presidency — that discrimination based on sexual discrimination violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    In a statement to Business Insider, the DOJ said:

    "Today's brief is consistent with the Justice Department's longstanding position and the holdings of ten different Courts of Appeals. The brief also reaffirms the Department's fundamental belief that the courts cannot expand the law beyond what Congress has provided. This Department remains committed to protecting the civil and constitutional rights of all individuals and will continue to enforce the numerous laws Congress has enacted that prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation."

    Employment lawyer and partner at Constangy, Brooks, Smith, and Prophete LLP, Jonathan Yarbrough, says that, until the laws surrounding workplace discrimination are clarified by the Supreme Court or reworked in Congress, it's likely that we will continue to see back-and-forth rulings continue.

    He adds that the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is openly clashing with the DOJ on this issue, as it interprets the law to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation.

    "If I got a Title VII charge today from a client and it was based on sexual orientation, I would be telling them, 'Look, at least at the EOOC level, if there is discrimination here on the basis of sexual orientation, we're probably going to get a cause finding,'" he tells Business Insider.

    For now, the five-person EEOC includes one Republican and three Democrat commissioners. President Trump has nominated Janet Dhillon to fill the vacant spot, and her Congressional approval is pending. Typically, the EEOC includes three members from the party controlling the White House and two members from the opposition party, so it's likely that the body will become majority Republican under the Trump administration.

    Yarbrough says he's curious to see whether the EEOC flips on the issue if and when it becomes majority Republican.

    "Right now, the DOJ's saying, 'Hey EEOC, even though it's your job to enforce Title VII, we don't believe you're doing it right because we don't believe Title VII addresses sexual orientation,'" he says. "We've got a strange situation right here."

    Jeff Sessions"The flip side is going to be, what is the business community going to do in response to this?" he adds.

    Selisse Berry, the founder and CEO of LGBT workplace-equality nonprofit Out and Equal Workplace Advocates, has been working with businesses for 20 years to encourage protections for LGBT workers in the office.

    She called the DOJ's brief, along with Trump's tweets declaring his intention to bar transgender people from serving in the military, "disappointing."

    Berry says that the rhetoric and DOJ's briefing may put some LGBT employees who have come out or are planning to come out in "a place of fear."

    "We can be married on Saturday and fired on Monday," Berry tells Business Insider. "It kind gives permission that discrimination is OK, when we've just seen over and over again that it doesn't help anybody. It doesn't help the employer and it doesn't help the employee."

    That being said, Berry says that when she began her advocacy, 4% of Fortune 500 companies had policies protecting LGBT workers — now 96% have such policies.

    "They understand the value that LGBT people bring to the workplace," she says. "They understand that the LGBT community is a market. More and more people are coming out at work all the time. I certainly know that our visibility and our community will continue to advance."

    Berry adds that 20 states now have laws banning discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation.

    "It's time for the federal government to stand up and do the same thing," Berry says.

    SEE ALSO: The Trump administration delayed a rule meant to help people launch businesses in the US — here's what that means for foreign entrepreneurs

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    Mobile Sub Penetration

    This is a preview of a research report from BI Intelligence, Business Insider's premium research service. To learn more about BI Intelligence, click here.

    European and North American countries with advanced economies often serve as bellwethers for the payments industry when it comes to introducing new and disruptive technologies.

    However, some of the greatest examples of digital payments disruption can be found in developing nations. In some cases, these countries not only adopt certain aspects of a digital payments ecosystem faster, but they also do so with more efficiency than their Western counterparts.

    The fact that digital disruption in these regions can be complex and varied, makes it difficult for the industry to devise effective strategies for international expansion — but understanding the drivers of this disruption can significantly aid payments companies. 

    Despite each region’s unique attributes, there are shared key conditions that make a market ripe for digital disruption. These include new payments infrastructure, increased access to financial services, and government intervention to drive digital payment capabilities.

    In this report, BI Intelligence examines several case studies of digital payments disruption to draw valuable insights for players in developed markets like the US to consider. These include India — which has made itself a laboratory of payments disruption — as well as other developing regions, including Latin America and East Africa. It also analyzes disruption in Australia to show how major digital disruption can be facilitated in a well-developed market. 

    Here are some key takeaways from the report: 

    • In November 2016, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that 500 and 1,000 rupee notes (worth about $7.50 and $15, respectively, at the time) — which represented 86% of currency in circulation — would no longer be legal tender in the country. Although this move was aimed at curbing corruption and counterfeiting, it had a far more wide-reaching consequence: It forced consumers to change how they pay, making India the largest case study of digital payments disruption in the world.
    • Mobile money services are setting the stage for other forms of digital payments in markets like East Africa. Firms that can integrate their payment products with such services could see tremendous success — in 2016, there were eight countries — including in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda —  in which more than 40% of the adult population was actively using mobile money, according to the GSMA.
    • Social media continues to see growth in users, making it a vital platform for payments players to integrate within South America — in this region there was a 30% growth year-over-year (YoY) in active mobile social users, and a 21% YoY increase in the number of active social media users, likely led by millennials.
    • Disruption isn't limited to developing nations. Australia, which already has a well-established payments industry, remains on the verge of digital disruption thanks to a $720 million investment that will overhaul the banking system.

    In full, the report:

    • Identifies the biggest drivers that are upending the payments industries in India, East Africa, Latin America, and Australia. 
    • Discusses what pain points digital payment services are solving. 
    • Details what specific technologies and services are being introduced that consumers are embracing, which can be leveraged by companies in these regions that are ripe for disruption.
    • Assesses how leaders in the space can leverage these trends to either improve their capabilities or to identify which markets may be ripe for disruption and worth exploring.
    • And much more

    To get the full report, subscribe to an ALL-ACCESS Membership with BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report AND more than 250 other expertly researched deep-dive reports, subscriptions to all of our daily newsletters, and much more. >> Learn More Now

    You can also purchase and download the report from our research store.

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    anthony scaramucci

    Curiously-worded comments by White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci on Thursday suggest a deepening rift between two factions in the Trump administration.

    "There are people inside the administration that think it is their job to save America from this president," Scaramucci said on CNN's "New Day" Thursday morning. "Ok, that is not their job. Their job is to inject this president into America."

    "It is not their job … to sit there and try to withhold the president, to rein him in or do things that will slow down his agenda," Scaramucci said. "That's not their job."

    The comments follow reports of ongoing tension between Scaramucci, who assumed the chief communications position on Friday, and other senior White House officials, including chief of staff Reince Priebus. In the same call-in to CNN, Scaramucci seemed to accuse Priebus of leaking Scaramucci's financial disclosure form to Politico, although the document is publicly available.

    "If Reince wants to explain that he's not a leaker, let him do that," Scaramucci said.

    "I can speak for my own actions. He's gonna need to speak for his own actions."

    Since joining the administration, Scaramucci has promised to crack down on media leaks and has publicly threatened to fire disloyal members of his communications team.

    But it was Scaramucci's comments about the motivations of White House staffers that drew the attention of CNN anchor Jake Tapper, who unpacked the implications Thursday evening.

    "What are these Trump administration officials doing to rein in President Trump, and why do they feel the need to do so?" Tapper said.

    "Why are they so concerned about the president's behavior that they think that they have to, quote, 'save America from this president'? Save America from what? What are they so worried about, these, quote, 'people inside the administration'?"

    SEE ALSO: 'They'll all be fired by me': Scaramucci is hinting at a massive White House purge — and 'paranoid schizophrenic' Priebus is at the top of the list

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    amazon fresh

    Just because Amazon will own Whole Foods, don't expect it to stop experimenting with its own cashier-less grocery stores and other grocery sales and delivery offerings.

    Even after Amazon completes its planned $13.7 billion purchase of Whole Foods, the online retail giants plans to stick with Amazon Fresh, Amazon Go and its other efforts to reinvent the way consumers shop for food, the company said on Thursday.

    In their first extended comments about the company's planned acquisition of the high-end grocery chain, Amazon officials said that they're still trying to see how customers want to shop for groceries. So the company has no plans to shut down any of its current experiments in grocery sales and delivery.

    "We'll see how the customers respond," Brian Olsavsky, Amazon's chief financial officer, said on a conference call with analysts after Amazon announced its second quarter results. "We believe there will be no one solution."

    Amazon announced last month it planned to purchase Whole Foods for $13.7 billion. The deal is pending approval by regulators. 

    But long before the deal, the e-commerce giant showed an interest in groceries. During the dot-com days, it invested in HomeGrocer, an early online grocery service. In 2007, it launched its own online grocery service called Amazon Fresh; it now makes deliveries in a select number of cities around the country and world. It also offers Prime Now, a service that allows customers to get groceries and other items delivered to their doorstep within hours of placing an order. And its been testing Amazon Go, a physical grocery store than allows customers to purchase items without having to interact with a cashier. 

    Amazon's first Go grocery store in Seattle is currently only open to Amazon employees. The store uses computer vision and payments technology so that shoppers can walk out with whatever they want.

    Amazon will continue to experiment with different ways of offering groceries, Olsavsky said. 

    In the meantime, the company is "looking forward" to working with Whole Foods, he said. 

    "They're customer centric like us," he said. 

    Because Amazon hasn't completed its acquisition of Whole Foods, it didn't include the grocery chain's expected results in its third quarter guidance. Amazon's outlook for the current quarter, which the company offered along with disappointing earnings, was below Wall Street's expectations.

    SEE ALSO: Amazon misses Wall Street expectations by a mile

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    Mexico's top drug lord Joaquin

    A European branch of Mexico's Sinaloa cartel has formed an alliance with a Romanian criminal group in order to smuggle narcotics into the UK, The Times of London reports, citing Britain's National Crime Agency.

    According to The Times, the Sinaloa branch has linked up with a Romanian gang that operates heavy goods vehicles — cargo vehicles with a total weight over 7,700 pounds— and has the ability to bring significant quantities of cocaine in Britain each week.

    "In collaboration with international partners [we] identified a Romanian OCG [organised crime group] with the capability to import large amounts of cocaine into the UK on a weekly basis using HGV transport," a NCA spokeswoman told The Times.

    "Intelligence indicates that the Romanian OCG are still being supplied by a Mexican OCG linked to the Sinaloa cartel. It is assessed that this network of OCGs will continue to supply large volumes of class A drugs into the UK," the spokeswoman added. "Previous significant interdictions of their supply has not deterred the group from continuing their criminal activity aimed at the UK market."

    There have been reports that the Sinaloa cartel and other Mexican organized-crime groups are active in Europe — Spain in particular — for some time.

    UK cocaine seizure drug bust

    Mexican investigative outlet Contralinea described Mexican criminal groups making connections with criminal groups around the world, including Europe and the UK, in early 2011. European police agency Europol warned Mexican groups were trying to set up trade routes to the continent in 2013 — but no member state has contacted the agency for assistance, The Times reports.

    According to the European Monitoring Center for Drugs and Addiction's 2016 report, larger Mexican and Colombian criminal groups in Europe have adopted the franchise model — allowing smaller, local partners to use the group's "brand name" and providing them with drugs, contacts, and transportation — in order to navigate the criminal landscape in Europe.

    "This is the new commercial model in Europe and we think that the Mexican and Colombian groups are adapting to it, seeking out established collaborators in Europe," Europol Director Rob Wainwright said in spring 2016.

    The Sinaloa cartel in particular is believed to have sought out a larger share of the European market, trying to replace Colombian groups as the continent's main provider.

    Cocaine use in UK Britain

    While the NCA said there was a lack of information on Mexican cartels shipping cocaine to the UK market, the agency suspects"they have proactively sought a position due to the high prices for cocaine in the UK and an opportunity to maximise profits."

    The UN Office on Drugs and Crime has estimated that cocaine can typically sell for just under $58,000 a kilogram at the wholesale level. At the retail level, a gram of cocaine can sell for about $59, according to the UNODC, though the price can vary considerably based on factors like purity and location.

    While the Sinaloa cartel is considered one of the most powerful criminal groups in the Western Hemisphere and the world, the cartel itself operates more like a federation of allied factions than like a traditional hierarchical cartel with a top-down leadership structure. Cartel leaders like Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman have typically worked in oversight roles, referring disputes.

    Mexico Sinaloa state Culiacan shooting killings violence

    Guzman's arrest in January 2016 and extradition to the US this January appear to have set off a fight for control of the organization by internal and external factions.

    The cartel's reputation for violence will raise worry about its effect on Britain's drug trade, which is already a driver of violence, The Times notes.

    An alliance with a Romanian gang involved in the movement of heavy goods vehicles is also likely to draw scrutiny to the Channel tunnel and ferry routes into the country, which see considerable freight traffic.

    Central American groups, as well as the Sinaloa cartel and other Mexican groups, have previously formed arrangements with gangs in the port city of Liverpool to bring in drugs by sea, typically from Venezuela and Ecuador, according to The Times. Local gangs would handle distribution from there.

    The Netherlands and Spain are the principal transit hubs for cocaine moving to the UK. The UK also had Europe's highest prevalence of use among people 15 to 34 years old, at 4%, followed by the Netherlands and Spain. Those three countries, plus Ireland, are the only ones in Europe to report prevalence levels above 2.5%.

    According to The Times, up to 100 metric tons of cocaine is shipped to the UK each year, and the NCA has intercepted almost 70 metric tons in a single year. In 2015, the most recent year for which there is data, authorities in the UK seized 4,228 kilograms of cocaine, according to the European Monitoring Center for Drugs and Addiction.

    SEE ALSO: Homeland Security chief John Kelly and CIA director Mike Pompeo reportedly flew over Mexican opium fields

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    NOW WATCH: Here's what $1 billion worth of cocaine looks like


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    mitch mcconnell

    The Senate is in its third day of a debate  to reshape the US healthcare system. 

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer ended the day Wednesday by calling the healthcare debate a "sham," pointing to the issue that it's not clear what bill will ultimately be voted on. Schumer said Democrats won't offer up any more amendments until they see the final product.  

    "We don't even have a final bill to amend," Schumer said.

    The debate has begun to shift toward a "skinny repeal" bill, which would repeal certain aspects of the ACA. If passed, it could lead to the House and Senate working together to compromise on one final bill. 

    The debate began earlier Tuesday, and the Senate has 20 hours of legislative time to debate, and about 10 have been used in the first two days. The time's split equally between Democrats and Republicans. Once that concludes, the Senate will then go into a "vote-a-rama" in which an unlimited number of amendments can be proposed to bed added onto the bill. 

    We'll be updating this post as the debate continues.  

    SEE ALSO: The 10 GOP senators who will decide the fate of the Republican healthcare bill

    DON'T MISS: Americans are facing rising out-of-pocket healthcare costs — here's why

    7:45 p.m. Senator Dean Heller introduces amendment to repeal "Cadillac tax."

    Senator Dean Heller of Nevada, who has been a key vote on the Senate healthcare plan, on Thursday introduced an amendment that would repeal the ACA's "Cadillac Tax." The "Cadillac tax" places a tax on high-end healthcare plans in an attempt to keep healthcare spending lower.   

    The vote, along with a motion to commit from Senator Chuck Schumer, is scheduled for 8:30 p.m.



    7:30 p.m. House Speaker Paul Ryan says he's willing to go to conference on the healthcare bill.

    On Thursday, Ryan commented on whether the House would take the skinny repeal bill to conference if it passes the Senate. 

    "If moving forward requires a conference committee, that is something the House is willing to do," Ryan said. 

    Whether that will be enough to sway some senators to vote for the bill remains to be seen. 



    6:45 p.m. - Senate Republicans start pushing for "skinny repeal."

    Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma spoke in favor of passing a "skinny" version of the GOP healthcare plan. 

    That happened shortly after four Republican senators said they demand assurances that the healthcare bill be taken to conference by the House should the Senate pass it.

    "I am not going to vote for the skinny bill if I'm not assured by the House there will be a conference where my idea and other ideas will be taken up so we can actually repeal Obamacare," Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said in a press conference Thursday with Senators John McCain, Ron Johnson, and Bill Cassidy.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    screen_shot_2017 07 27_at_5.34.53_pm_1024

    The Senate Republican healthcare process descended into disarray Thursday evening, as four GOP senators threatened to withhold support for a more moderate, "skinnier" attempt at repealing certain parts of the Affordable Care Act.

    "I am not going to vote for the skinny bill if I'm not assured by the House there will be a conference where my idea and other ideas will be taken up so we can actually repeal Obamacare," Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said in a press conference Thursday with Sens. John McCain, Ron Johnson, and Bill Cassidy.

    Graham added: "I'm not going to vote for a bill that is terrible policy and horrible politics just because we have to get something done."

    The last-ditch, so-called skinny repeal effort would consist of a series of amendments would aim to repeal certain unpopular parts of the Affordable Care Act, including mandates to get health insurance. 

    At the end of the 20-hour debate period, if no bill has been picked up, the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would move on to the "skinny repeal" plan. If passed, it could lead to the House and Senate working together to compromise on one final bill in conference. 

    The aim is to find common ground with the House on a bill that becomes more fleshed-out. But the House doesn't necessarily have to call a conference on the bill. It could simply pass the bill and send it to the president.

    After the press conference, House Speaker Paul Ryan expressed a willingness to take the bill to conference.

    "If moving forward requires a conference committee, that is something the House is willing to do," he said. 

    The four GOP senators said they wanted assurances from House Republican leadership — including House Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy — that they would not pass the bill, which Graham called a "fraud."

    The senators didn't specify what kind of assurances they would request.

    "It's like pornography. You'll know it when you see it," Graham said.

    The House is supposed to go into recess starting on Friday, but on Thursday, they were told to stay flexible with their travel plans. 

    "While last votes are currently scheduled to take place tomorrow, Members are advised that — pending Senate action on healthcare — the House schedule is subject to change," McCarthy wrote. "All Members should remain flexible in their travel plans over the next few days."

    What 'skinny repeal' would look like:

    • The "skinny repeal" bill would repeal both the individual and employer mandates, which requires individuals to have health insurance, and employers to provide health insurance to employees. If they don't, they face a penalty fee under Obamacare.
    •  It would also repeal some of the taxes that the ACA put in place — most significantly, a tax on medical-device makers. 
    • The skinny bill would likely leave everything else untouched. 
    • The bill could also have some language around waiving essential health benefits, which could require the bill to get 60 votes to pass without a filibuster. 

    While the text of the "skinny repeal" bill hasn't been released yet, the bill would be nowhere near as extensive as the full-repeal plan or the BCRA. But it would seek to alter the much-criticized mandates that Republicans have targeted for years.

    The Congressional Budget Office scored the "skinny" plan on Wednesday and found that it would leave 16 million more Americans without health insurance.

    SEE ALSO: LIVE: The Senate healthcare debate moves into its third day

    DON'T MISS: The Senate's plan to repeal and replace Obamacare has hit a setback

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: 'Where is Sean?': Things got awkward when April Ryan asked Sarah Sanders why Spicer didn’t attend the WH briefing


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    Mercedes-Benz Stadium

    Mercedes-Benz Stadium, the new home of the Atlanta Falcons, is set to open its doors to the public in less than a month, but thanks to construction delays, there is still much work to be done.

    The most significant effect of these setbacks will literally overshadow any action on the field. According to Steve Cannon, CEO of the Falcons' parent company, the venue's large retractable roof has yet to be mechanized. It will be closed when fans arrive for the stadium's first event, a preseason game against the Arizona Cardinals on August 26, and it will stay closed through Atlanta's home opener against the Green Bay Packers on September 17.

    "As we come into new information and new obstacles, we figure out what impact it’s going to have on schedule," Cannon told Tim Tucker of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "It became clear, based on the construction moves of the roof we have had, based on some of the delays we have had, that we didn’t have time to automate the roof."

    The stadium's retractable roof will be unlike any other, opening up like a flower and inspired by the Oculus in the Pantheon of ancient Rome.

    This is just the latest obstacle in what has been a long and drawn-out building process. The stadium was supposed to open on March 1 of this year, but that was pushed back to the day of the Falcons' third preseason game. Furthermore, early estimates predicted a $700 million price tag for the project, but a recent assessment put the total cost at $1.6 billion.

    While Cannon said initially that the mechanization process would take around 40 days, the project is now expected to be completed no earlier than mid-October. That means the Falcons will play at least three home games under the roof, regardless of the weather.

    The delay will be a bummer for fans who want to enjoy the sunshine, but to Cannon, using the stadium as it is is preferable to finding a replacement venue.

    "We’d rather just have great events under a closed roof,” he said.

    Falcons fans may be frustrated for now, but the new stadium will provide some undeniable perks once it opens. A graphic of the venue's low concession prices went viral earlier this month.

    Join the conversation about this story »

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    paul ryan

    House Speaker Paul Ryan said he's willing to take Senate Republicans'"skinnier" attempt at repealing certain parts of the Affordable Care Act to conference. 

    "If moving forward requires a conference committee, that is something the House is willing to do," he said in a statement on Thursday. That's so long as the Senate can pass the bill.

    "The House remains committed to finding a solution and working with our Senate colleagues, but the burden remains on the Senate to demonstrate that it is capable of passing something that keeps our promise, as the House has already done," Ryan said.

    The last-ditch, so-called skinny repeal effort would consist of a series of amendments that would aim to repeal certain unpopular parts of the Affordable Care Act, including mandates to get health insurance. 

    At the end of the 20-hour debate period, if no bill has been picked up, the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would move on to the "skinny repeal" plan. If passed, it could lead to the House and Senate working together to compromise on one final bill in conference. 

    The aim is to find common ground with the House on a bill that becomes more fleshed-out. But the House doesn't necessarily have to call a conference on the bill. It could simply pass the bill and send it to the president.

    Ryan's statement might not be enough for the four GOP senators — Lindsey Graham, John McCain, Ron Johnson, and Bill Cassidy — who said they wanted assurances from House Republican leadership — including Ryan and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy — that they would not pass the bill, which Graham called a "fraud."

    The senators didn't specify what kind of assurances they would request.

    "It's like pornography. You'll know it when you see it," Graham said.

    The House is supposed to go into recess starting on Friday, but on Thursday, they were told to stay flexible with their travel plans. 

    "While last votes are currently scheduled to take place [Friday], Members are advised that — pending Senate action on healthcare — the House schedule is subject to change," McCarthy wrote. "All Members should remain flexible in their travel plans over the next few days."

    Here's Ryan's full statement:

    "It is now obvious that the only path ahead is for the Senate to pass the narrow legislation that it is currently considering. This package includes important reforms like eliminating the job-killing employer mandate and the requirement that forces people to purchase coverage they don’t want. Still it is not enough to solve the many failures of Obamacare.

    "Senators have made clear that this is an effort to keep the process alive, not to make law. If moving forward requires a conference committee, that is something the House is willing to do. The reality, however, is that repealing and replacing Obamacare still ultimately requires the Senate to produce 51 votes for an actual plan."

    "The House remains committed to finding a solution and working with our Senate colleagues, but the burden remains on the Senate to demonstrate that it is capable of passing something that keeps our promise, as the House has already done. Until the Senate can do that, we will never be able to develop a conference report that becomes law. We expect the Senate to act first on whatever the conference committee produces. Obamacare is collapsing and hurting American families. We have to keep working at this until we get the job done." 

    What 'skinny repeal' would look like:

    • The "skinny repeal" bill would repeal both the individual and employer mandates, which requires individuals to have health insurance, and employers to provide health insurance to employees. If they don't, they face a penalty fee under Obamacare.
    •  It would also repeal some of the taxes that the ACA put in place — most significantly, a tax on medical-device makers. 
    • The skinny bill would likely leave everything else untouched. 
    • The bill could also have some language around waiving essential health benefits, which could require the bill to get 60 votes to pass without a filibuster. 

    While the text of the "skinny repeal" bill hasn't been released yet, the bill would be nowhere near as extensive as the full-repeal plan or the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA). But it would seek to alter the much-criticized mandates that Republicans have targeted for years.

    The Congressional Budget Office scored the "skinny" plan on Wednesday and found that it would leave 16 million more Americans without health insurance.

    SEE ALSO: LIVE: The Senate healthcare debate moves into its third day

    DON'T MISS: The Senate's plan to repeal and replace Obamacare has hit a setback

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Listen to the leaked audio of Australia's prime minister mocking Trump